14 days in United States Itinerary

14 days in United States Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States vacation planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Oklahoma City
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Eureka Springs
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Little Rock
— 2 nights
Drive
4
Hot Springs
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Biloxi
— 1 day
Drive
6
New Orleans
— 2 nights
Drive

S M T W T F S
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Oklahoma City

— 2 nights

The Big Friendly

Oklahoma City, known to many as the "Big Friendly," represents the political, cultural, and economic engine of the state of Oklahoma.
Bring the kids along to Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum and National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Do some cultural sightseeing at SKELETONS: Museum of Osteology and Science Museum Oklahoma. Take a break from Oklahoma City with a short trip to Tiger Safari Zoological Park in Tuttle, about 36 minutes away. And it doesn't end there: stop by Bricktown, examine the collection at Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame, pause for some serene contemplation at St. Joseph Old Cathedral, and explore the activities along Hefner Lake & Park.

To see ratings, more things to do, traveler tips, and more tourist information, use the Oklahoma City trip planner.

Miami to Oklahoma City is an approximately 5.5-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. The time zone difference when traveling from Miami to Oklahoma City is minus 1 hour. Expect slightly colder weather when traveling from Miami in March: highs in Oklahoma City hover around 65°F, while lows dip to 40°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 29th (Mon) so you can go by car to Eureka Springs.

Things to do in Oklahoma City

Museums · Childrens Museums · Parks · Neighborhoods

Side Trip

Eureka Springs

— 2 nights

Little Switzerland of America

Nestled in the heart of the Ozark Mountains, the whole town of Eureka Springs is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
On the 30th (Tue), buy something for everyone on your list at Branson Landing, relax and rejuvenate at Pure Tranquility Massage, and then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church. Keep things going the next day: look for all kinds of wild species at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and then take in the spiritual surroundings of Thorncrown Chapel.

Planning Eureka Springs trip won't be overwhelming when you use Inspirock's itinerary maker.

Getting from Oklahoma City to Eureka Springs by car takes about 4.5 hours. Other options: fly; or do a combination of bus and car. When traveling from Oklahoma City in March, plan for a bit cooler days and about the same nights in Eureka Springs: temperatures range from 59°F by day to 38°F at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 31st (Wed) to allow time to drive to Little Rock.

Things to do in Eureka Springs

Historic Sites · Wildlife · Parks · Spas

Side Trip

Little Rock

— 2 nights

The Rock

Once inhabited by Native American tribes, today Little Rock bustles with nearly 800,000 people.
On the 1st (Thu), steep yourself in history at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, view the masterpieces at The Galleries at Library Square, hunt for treasures at River Market District, then contemplate the long history of William J. Clinton Presidential Library, and finally make a trip to La Petit Roche Plaza. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: listen to music at Arkansas Arts Center, then don't miss a visit to The Old Mill, then immerse yourself in nature at Pinnacle Mountain State Park, and finally appreciate the history behind Testament: The Little Rock Nine Monument.

For photos, reviews, and other tourist information, use the Little Rock road trip tool.

You can drive from Eureka Springs to Little Rock in 4 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of taxi and bus. In March, plan for daily highs up to 63°F, and evening lows to 43°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 2nd (Fri) so you can drive to Hot Springs.

Things to do in Little Rock

Historic Sites · Shopping · Museums · Wildlife

Side Trip

Hot Springs

— 2 nights

Valley of the Vapors

Set deep in the Ouachita Mountains, the city of Hot Springs almost completely surrounds the national park of the same name.
Kick off your visit on the 3rd (Sat): don't miss a visit to Bathhouse Row, then explore the wealth of natural beauty at Dapper & Debonaire, then get all the information you need at Fordyce Bathhouse, and finally indulge in some personalized pampering at some of the best spas. On the 4th (Sun), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: enjoy breathtaking views from Hot Springs Mountain Tower, cast your line with Xtreme Strike Guide Service, and then take in nature's colorful creations at Garvan Woodland Gardens.

To find traveler tips, ratings, more things to do, and more tourist information, refer to the Hot Springs trip planner.

Traveling by car from Little Rock to Hot Springs takes an hour. Alternatively, you can do a combination of bus and taxi; or do a combination of train and taxi. Expect a daytime high around 73°F in April, and nighttime lows around 52°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 4th (Sun) to allow enough time to travel to Biloxi.

Things to do in Hot Springs

Historic Sites · Parks · Outdoors · Spas

Biloxi

— 1 day

Playground of the South

A busy city on the Gulf Coast, Biloxi is one of the nation's oldest communities, first settled by Europeans in 1699.
Start off your visit on the 5th (Mon): contemplate the long history of Beauvoir, then kick back and relax at Biloxi Beach, then take a leisurely stroll along Biloxi Lighthouse Pier, and finally see what you can catch with a fishing tour.

To find where to stay, other places to visit, maps, and other tourist information, read Biloxi road trip planning tool.

Getting from Hot Springs to Biloxi by car takes about 9.5 hours. Other options: fly; or drive; or do a combination of taxi and bus. Plan for somewhat warmer nights when traveling from Hot Springs in April since evenings lows in Biloxi dip to 61°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 5th (Mon) early enough to go by car to New Orleans.

Things to do in Biloxi

Outdoors · Beaches · Historic Sites · Tours

New Orleans

— 2 nights

The Big Easy

Known for its Creole cuisine, rich musical tradition, and nearby swamps and plantations, New Orleans is one of the nation's oldest cities.
Kick off your visit on the 6th (Tue): pause for some serene contemplation at St. Louis Cathedral, then learn about all things military at The National WWII Museum, and then get to know the fascinating history of Garden District. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: appreciate the extensive heritage of French Quarter, then stop by Faulkner House Books, then take a stroll through Royal Street, and finally get a dose of the wild on Happiness Bayou Tours.

To see ratings, where to stay, more things to do, and other tourist information, go to the New Orleans trip planning tool.

You can drive from Biloxi to New Orleans in 2 hours. Other options are to drive; or take a bus. Traveling from Biloxi in April, you will find days in New Orleans are little chillier (71°F), and nights are a bit warmer (71°F). Wrap up your sightseeing on the 7th (Wed) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in New Orleans

Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Museums · Outdoors

United States travel guide

4.5
Specialty Museums · Beaches · Historic Sites
More than the country of car-packed streets seen in TV shows and movies, the United States of America is a complex and diverse home to over 300 million people living in a wide range of landscapes and climates. From its big-city skyscrapers to its sprawling natural parks, the country's ''melting pot'' combines many ethnic groups that share a strong sense of national identity despite their cultural differences. A country of road trips and big blue skies, the United States harbors orderly cities filled with restaurants, parks, museums, and innumerable sightseeing opportunities, as well as pristine natural areas perfect for a holiday in the great outdoors. To see as much as you can of this diverse land quickly, drive over some of the more than 6 million km (4 million mi) of highways leading through deserts, mountain peaks, fertile fields, and giant urban centers.

Arkansas travel guide

4.4
State Parks · Historic Sites · Art Museums
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.

Mississippi travel guide

3.5
Casinos · Historic Sites · History Museums
The Magnolia State
Still relatively unspoiled by mass tourism, Mississippi epitomizes rich history and offers warm hospitality to those who vacation here. The Mississippi River forms most of its western border, so it's no surprise that this mighty waterway shapes the lives of people calling the "Magnolia State" their home. The river influences everything from the food they eat to the music they listen to. Perhaps the easiest way to discover Mississippi is to take a drive on the 715 km (444 mi) long national parkway, which follows a route used since pre-colonial times that's famous for its scenic beauty and attractions of historical interest. At the end of the parkway sits a town packed with nearly 600 antebellum homes.

Louisiana travel guide

4.3
Historic Walking Areas · Nightlife · Military Museums
The Pelican State
With a landscape of deltas, marshes, and swamps formed by the sediments of the Mississippi River, Louisiana is home to rich native plant and animal life, including rare species of tree frogs, ibis, and egrets. The state's urban areas, most notably the historical city of New Orleans, are some of its most popular attractions and boast a varied multicultural and multilingual heritage, strongly influenced by a mix of French, Spanish, Native American, and African cultures. Native Louisianans proudly cling to their distinctive dialects and musical traditions, offering visitors a chance to explore one of the most culturally diverse areas in North America. The homeland of both Cajun and Creole cuisines, Louisiana remains a top holiday destination for foodies from around the world.