15 days in Continental USA Itinerary

15 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Hammond
— 1 night
Drive
2
Chicago
— 3 nights
Drive
3
Branson
— 1 night
Drive
4
Eureka Springs
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Oklahoma City
— 2 nights
Drive
6
Wichita
— 1 night
Drive
7
Saint Louis
— 1 night
Drive

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Hammond

— 1 night
Hammond is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States. Kick off your visit on the 11th (Sat): admire the striking features of Lake County Sheriff's House & Jail, then experience rural life at County Line Orchard, then grab your bike and head to Wolf Lake Memorial Park, and finally try to win big at Horseshoe Hammond.

Plan my trip to Hammond with suggested itineraries provided by Inspirock.

Cleveland to Hammond is an approximately 5.5-hour flight. You can also drive; or do a combination of bus and train. Due to the time zone difference, you'll gain 1 hour traveling from Cleveland to Hammond. Traveling from Cleveland in September, plan for slightly colder nights in Hammond, with lows around 56°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 11th (Sat) so you can go by car to Chicago.

Things to do in Hammond

Casinos · Fun & Games · Trails · Parks

Side Trips

Chicago

— 3 nights

Windy City

A huge and vibrant city, Chicago is home to top-notch theaters, shops, museums, galleries, and restaurants.
Chicago is known for museums, parks, and nightlife. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: admire the masterpieces at The Art Institute of Chicago, get curious at Museum of Science and Industry, find something for the whole family at Fox in a Box Chicago, and don't miss a visit to Skydeck Chicago - Willis Tower.

To see other places to visit, reviews, ratings, and tourist information, go to the Chicago trip itinerary website.

Drive from Hammond to Chicago in an hour. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In September, plan for daily highs up to 78°F, and evening lows to 61°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 14th (Tue) early enough to travel to Branson.

Things to do in Chicago

Museums · Theme Parks · Childrens Museums · Shopping

Branson

— 1 night

Live Entertainment Capital of the World

Nestled in Missouri's beautiful Ozark Mountains lies one of the country's most attractive vacation towns for year-round family entertainment.
Kick off your visit on the 15th (Wed): take some stellar pictures from 165 Scenic Overlook, take some stellar pictures from College of the Ozarks, then browse the different shops at Branson Landing, and finally make a trip to Dancing Water Fountain. Keep things going the next day: get in on the family fun at Arcade City, then awaken your taste buds at VIP Tours of Branson, and then examine the collection at Titanic Museum.

To find more things to do, where to stay, other places to visit, and tourist information, go to the Branson online journey planner.

Drive from Chicago to Branson in 9.5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or drive; or do a combination of train, bus, and taxi. Expect a daytime high around 82°F in September, and nighttime lows around 60°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 16th (Thu) early enough to drive to Eureka Springs.

Things to do in Branson

Tours · Wineries · Parks · Shopping

Eureka Springs

— 2 nights

Little Switzerland of America

Nestled in the heart of the Ozark Mountains, the whole town of Eureka Springs is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Start off your visit on the 17th (Fri): wander the streets of Eureka Springs Historical Downtown, walk around Basin Spring Park, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Thorncrown Chapel, then look for gifts at Fresh Harvest Tasting Room - Eureka Springs, and finally appreciate the history behind Christ of the Ozarks. On the 18th (Sat), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: identify plant and animal life at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge, stroll around Bentonville Town Square, then take an in-depth tour of The Walmart Museum, and finally explore the world behind art at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.

Planning Eureka Springs trip won't be overwhelming when you use Inspirock's itinerary maker.

You can drive from Branson to Eureka Springs in 1.5 hours. In September, plan for daily highs up to 82°F, and evening lows to 62°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 18th (Sat) so you can go by car to Oklahoma City.

Things to do in Eureka Springs

Parks · Wildlife · Museums · Historic Sites

Side Trip

Oklahoma City

— 2 nights

The Big Friendly

Oklahoma City, known to many as the "Big Friendly," represents the political, cultural, and economic engine of the state of Oklahoma.
Kick off your visit on the 19th (Sun): learn about wildlife with up-close encounters at Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden, then pause for some photo ops at Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, and then pause for some serene contemplation at St. Joseph Old Cathedral. Keep things going the next day: explore the world behind art at National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, then make a trip to Skydance Bridge, then engage your brain at SKELETONS: Museum of Osteology, and finally wander the streets of Bricktown.

For reviews, photos, where to stay, and tourist information, go to the Oklahoma City tour builder site.

You can drive from Eureka Springs to Oklahoma City in 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or do a combination of car and bus. September in Oklahoma City sees daily highs of 87°F and lows of 64°F at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 20th (Mon) so you can go by car to Wichita.

Things to do in Oklahoma City

Museums · Parks · Zoos & Aquariums · Neighborhoods

Wichita

— 1 night
Kick off your visit on the 21st (Tue): make a trip to The Keeper of the Plains, meet the residents at Sedgwick County Zoo, and then look for gifts at Nifty Nut House.

For ratings, maps, where to stay, and more tourist information, you can read our Wichita day trip planning website.

Traveling by car from Oklahoma City to Wichita takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or fly. In September in Wichita, expect temperatures between 86°F during the day and 62°F at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 21st (Tue) to allow time to travel to Saint Louis.

Things to do in Wichita

Parks · Zoos & Aquariums · Shopping

Saint Louis

— 1 night

Gateway to the West

Test the local claim that Saint Louis is second only to Washington, D.C. in the number of free activities available by spending your holiday exploring the city's central neighborhoods, famous for their restored century-old red-brick buildings.
On the 22nd (Wed), get some fabulous bargains at Herbaria, then take in nature's colorful creations at Missouri Botanical Garden, then pause for some serene contemplation at Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, and finally walk around Forest Park. On the 23rd (Thu), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: learn about wildlife with up-close encounters at Saint Louis Zoo, indulge your taste buds at Food & Drink, and then see the interesting displays at Cardinals Hall of Fame and Museum.

Ask Inspirock to suggest an itinerary and make planning a trip to Saint Louis fast, fun, and easy.

Traveling by flight from Wichita to Saint Louis takes 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. September in Saint Louis sees daily highs of 84°F and lows of 59°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Thu) to allow enough time to travel back home.

Things to do in Saint Louis

Parks · Zoos & Aquariums · Tours · Breweries & Distilleries

Indiana travel guide

4.1
Casinos · Room Escape Games · Specialty Museums
The Hoosier State
With an extensive history of motorsports, Indiana's main claim to fame is the popular automobile race held each year in its capital city. A mostly rural state, Indiana is a land of till plains and lakes, its appearance a result of traces left behind by receding glaciers. The central section of the state, mostly flat with some rolling hills, contains some of the country's most fertile farmland. The state also contains almost 39,000 km (24,000 mi) of waterways, including the Wabash River, the longest free-flowing river east of the Mississippi. For a genuine "Hoosier" experience, tour the state's slow-paced small towns, noted for their hospitality and outstanding local cuisine. You'll remember the warmth and charm long after your vacation is over.

Illinois travel guide

4.4
Observation Decks · Parks · Art Museums
The Prairie State
The most populous state in the country's Midwest region, Illinois features a diverse landscape that includes both the enormous urban sprawl of Chicago and flat central plains, devoted almost entirely to farmland. With a great selection of things to do, Chicago is the state's centerpiece, featuring world-famous architecture and renowned museums. Farther away from this giant urban center, you can explore historical landmarks dedicated to local heroes Abraham Lincoln and Ernest Hemingway. The state also includes a prehistoric Native American site, one of only 20 World Heritage Sites in the United States, a unique feature well-worth adding to your itinerary.

Missouri travel guide

4.6
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.

Arkansas travel guide

4.5
State Parks · Historic Sites · Art Museums
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.

Oklahoma travel guide

4
Casinos · Monuments · Art Museums
The Sooner State
Boasting a rich Native American heritage and named after the Choctaw word for "Red People," Oklahoma remains home to about 40 native tribes who speak 25 distinct languages. Though the state remains one of the country's top producers of agricultural products, most of its inhabitants live within two metropolitan areas, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The state is home to the 500-million-year-old Wichita Mountains, noted for being the site of the oldest national wildlife refuge in the United States. Explore the state's pristine natural areas while on vacation here, but be sure to leave plenty of time to tour its characteristic small towns, known for their food, music, and cultural festivals.

Kansas travel guide

4.3
Specialty Museums · Zoos · Entertainment Centers
The Sunflower State
Generally considered the geographical center of the country, Kansas is a state rich in history, having served as home to diverse Native American tribes for thousands of years before European settlement. Once called "Bleeding Kansas" because of violent clashes between abolitionists and pro-slavery settlers, Kansas now carries the nickname the "Sunflower State," earned because of its massive production of sunflowers, corn, wheat, and sorghum. In addition to agriculture, the state is also known as an aviation hub. Sightseeing is easy, as wide-open spaces dominate the landscape of the western two-thirds of the state, which includes some of the only remaining native tallgrass prairie in the nation. Eastern Kansas contains rolling hills and most of the major cities, which draw tourism with their lively art, nightlife, and music scenes.