15 days in Continental USA Itinerary

15 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States trip planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Eureka Springs
— 1 night
Drive
2
Oklahoma City
— 1 night
Fly
3
San Francisco
— 2 nights
Fly
4
Page
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Sedona
— 3 nights
Drive
6
Santa Fe
— 2 nights
Drive
7
Albuquerque
— 1 night
Fly
8
Austin
— 1 night
Drive
9
San Antonio
— 1 night
Fly

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Eureka Springs

— 1 night

Little Switzerland of America

Nestled in the heart of the Ozark Mountains, the whole town of Eureka Springs is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Start off your visit on the 1st (Tue): take in a show at Escape Room 13, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church, and then take a memorable tour with Ozark Mountain Ziplines. Here are some ideas for day two: take in the spiritual surroundings of Thorncrown Chapel, then get interesting insight from Tours, then explore the historical opulence of Quigley's Castle, and finally shop like a local with The Birdcage.

To find photos, traveler tips, reviews, and other tourist information, use the Eureka Springs road trip planner.

Miami to Eureka Springs is an approximately 6-hour flight. You can also drive; or do a combination of bus, subway, and taxi. The time zone difference moving from Eastern Standard Time (EST) to Central Standard Time (CST) is minus 1 hour. Traveling from Miami in September, expect Eureka Springs to be little chillier, temps between 82°F and 62°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 2nd (Wed) so you can go by car to Oklahoma City.

Things to do in Eureka Springs

Historic Sites · Tours · Outdoors · Adventure

Oklahoma City

— 1 night

The Big Friendly

Oklahoma City, known to many as the "Big Friendly," represents the political, cultural, and economic engine of the state of Oklahoma.
Kick off your visit on the 3rd (Thu): contemplate the long history of Henry Overholser Mansion, then stroll around Martin Park Nature Center, and then go all around town with Ride OKC.

To see traveler tips, maps, more things to do, and other tourist information, go to the Oklahoma City trip itinerary planning app.

You can drive from Eureka Springs to Oklahoma City in 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or do a combination of car and bus. In September, plan for daily highs up to 87°F, and evening lows to 64°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 3rd (Thu) early enough to travel to San Francisco.

Things to do in Oklahoma City

Breweries & Distilleries · Tours · Outdoors · Historic Sites

San Francisco

— 2 nights

City by the Bay

San Francisco is a top holiday destination featuring scenic beauty and great ethnic and cultural diversity.
Kick off your visit on the 4th (Fri): explore the striking landscape of Alcatraz Island, kick back and relax at Gray Whale Cove State Beach, and then enjoy the sand and surf at Naples Beach. Keep things going the next day: take in the views from Golden Gate Bridge, then admire the majestic nature at Marin Headlands, and then hike along Lands End.

To find more things to do and tourist information, you can read our San Francisco road trip tool.

You can fly from Oklahoma City to San Francisco in 5.5 hours. Other options are to drive; or take a bus. Traveling from Oklahoma City to San Francisco, you'll gain 2 hours due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Oklahoma City in September, expect San Francisco to be little chillier, temps between 76°F and 58°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 5th (Sat) to allow time to travel to Page.

Things to do in San Francisco

Parks · Nature · Outdoors · Historic Sites

Side Trips

Page

— 2 nights

Center of Canyon Country

Originally little more than a simple camp constructed to house workers who built a nearby dam on the Colorado River, Page is now a popular stop for travelers preparing a trip to Arizona's canyon country.
Start off your visit on the 6th (Sun): look for all kinds of wild species at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: have fun at Gunfighter Canyon, then look for all kinds of wild species at Wilderness River Adventures, and then tour the pleasant surroundings at Rainbow Bridge National Monument.

To see other places to visit, reviews, photos, and other tourist information, use the Page trip itinerary planner.

Fly from San Francisco to Page in 7.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of subway, bus, and shuttle. The time zone difference when traveling from San Francisco to Page is 1 hour. While traveling from San Francisco, expect a bit warmer days and about the same nights in Page, ranging from highs of 86°F to lows of 63°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 7th (Mon) early enough to drive to Sedona.

Things to do in Page

Wildlife · Nature · Parks · Adventure

Sedona

— 3 nights

Red Rock Country

Despite its relatively small size, Sedona overflows with tourist appeal.
Visiting Red Rock Scenic Byway (SR 179) and Doe Mountain Trail will get you outdoors. Step off the beaten path and head to Amitabha Stupa & Peace Park and Bear Mountain Trail. Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Sedona: Jerome (Jerome State Historic Park & Douglas Mansion). There's still lots to do: get interesting insight from Sedona Adventure Tours, do sightseeing your way with Arizona Tour & Travel - Day Tours, explore the striking landscape at Snoopy Rock, and look for gifts at Psychic Readings by Nirup.

To find where to stay, other places to visit, reviews, and other tourist information, use the Sedona route maker tool.

Drive from Page to Sedona in 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of shuttle and bus; or do a combination of flight and bus. Expect a daytime high around 85°F in September, and nighttime lows around 63°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 10th (Thu) early enough to go by car to Santa Fe.

Things to do in Sedona

Parks · Outdoors · Nature · Historic Sites

Side Trips

Santa Fe

— 2 nights

City Different

Santa Fe continuously ranks among the world's top holiday destinations, attracting visitors with its unusual combination of scenic beauty, rich history, cultural diversity, and high concentration of performing arts venues, fine restaurants, and interesting attractions.
Kick off your visit on the 11th (Fri): make a trip to San Ildefonso Pueblo, then explore the galleries of San Miguel Chapel, then get a taste of life in the country at El Rancho de las Golondrinas, and finally trek along Canyon Trail. On the next day, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at El Santuario de Chimayo, then gain insight at Tsankawi prehistoic site - bandelier national monument, and then get impressive views of Jemez Mountains.

To see maps, more things to do, traveler tips, and tourist information, read our Santa Fe trip tool.

Traveling by car from Sedona to Santa Fe takes 7 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or do a combination of bus and train. Plan for slightly colder temperatures traveling from Sedona in September, with highs in Santa Fe at 80°F and lows at 52°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 12th (Sat) to allow time to drive to Albuquerque.

Things to do in Santa Fe

Parks · Historic Sites · Trails · Outdoors

Side Trips

Albuquerque

— 1 night

Duke City

Albuquerque remains one of the state's secret jewels, as its tourist attractions are often overshadowed by the more popular holiday destination of Santa Fe.
Kick off your visit on the 13th (Sun): take in the dramatic natural features at Petroglyph National Monument, then explore by horseback at The Stables at Tamaya, and then stroll through La Luz Trail.

To find traveler tips, maps, ratings, and tourist information, go to the Albuquerque trip maker tool.

Traveling by car from Santa Fe to Albuquerque takes an hour. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Plan for somewhat warmer nights when traveling from Santa Fe in September since evenings lows in Albuquerque dip to 60°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 13th (Sun) to allow enough time to travel to Austin.

Things to do in Albuquerque

Parks · Trails · Outdoors · Historic Sites

Side Trip

Highlights from your trip

Austin

— 1 night

Live Music Capital of the World

Despite its laid-back college vibe, Austin is an influential center for politics, technology, film, and music.
Start off your visit on the 14th (Mon): get a sense of history and politics at Texas State Capitol, paddle through the water with a kayaking and canoeing tour, and then stroll through Lady Bird Lake Hike-and-Bike Trail.

To find maps, traveler tips, more things to do, and other tourist information, read Austin trip maker app.

Traveling by flight from Albuquerque to Austin takes 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. The time zone difference when traveling from Albuquerque to Austin is 1 hour. Prepare for somewhat warmer weather when traveling from Albuquerque in September: high temperatures in Austin hover around 93°F and lows are around 71°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 14th (Mon) so you can drive to San Antonio.

Things to do in Austin

Outdoors · Historic Sites · Adventure · Tours

San Antonio

— 1 night

The Alamo City

As the state’s second largest city, San Antonio embodies Texas’ rich cultural heritage while maintaining the Old West charm of an oil town.
Start off your visit on the 15th (Tue): contemplate the long history of The Alamo, admire the architecture and history at Mission San Juan, and then identify plant and animal life at Medina River Natural Area.

To see ratings, photos, and tourist information, read our San Antonio online trip planner.

Getting from Austin to San Antonio by car takes about 1.5 hours. Other options: take a bus; or take a train. In September, daily temperatures in San Antonio can reach 94°F, while at night they dip to 73°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 15th (Tue) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in San Antonio

Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Wildlife

Arkansas travel guide

4.5
State Parks · Historic Sites · Art Museums
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.

Oklahoma travel guide

4
Casinos · Monuments · Art Museums
The Sooner State
Boasting a rich Native American heritage and named after the Choctaw word for "Red People," Oklahoma remains home to about 40 native tribes who speak 25 distinct languages. Though the state remains one of the country's top producers of agricultural products, most of its inhabitants live within two metropolitan areas, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The state is home to the 500-million-year-old Wichita Mountains, noted for being the site of the oldest national wildlife refuge in the United States. Explore the state's pristine natural areas while on vacation here, but be sure to leave plenty of time to tour its characteristic small towns, known for their food, music, and cultural festivals.

California travel guide

4.1
Specialty Museums · Wineries & Vineyards · Beaches
The Golden State
The country's most populous state, California includes landscapes that range from the forested northern coast to harsh southern deserts. Sandwiched right in the middle of the state is a fertile valley, home to farms, vineyards, and orchards. California's cities offer diverse attractions, from amusement parks and upscale shops to award-winning restaurants and innovative art galleries. Outside the state's big urban centers, places to visit include some of the nation's most rugged national parks, ancient forests, towering mountain peaks, and ski resorts. More than just a surfing destination famous for its beaches and winding coastal roads, California also boasts one of the world's largest economies, bolstered by the booming tech industries.

Arizona travel guide

4.3
Canyons · Geologic Formations · Hiking Trails
The Grand Canyon State
Known as the "Grand Canyon State," Arizona boasts dense forests, deep gorges, sprawling national parks, and modern ski resorts. Native American reservations take up about a quarter of the state, housing several tribes and offering visitors a chance to discover the varied cultures of the country's indigenous population. A patchwork of diverse tourist attractions, Arizona features exclusive golf courses and upscale shops, as well as cactus-covered canyons and stretches of desolate desert straight out of old Westerns, perfect for a vacation far from the city bustle. Though the state still clings to its Old West flavor, its busy college towns packed with young students from around the world exude a cosmopolitan atmosphere.

New Mexico travel guide

4.1
Specialty Museums · Geologic Formations · Historic Walking Areas
Land of Enchantment
New Mexico is a land of distinctive regional cuisine and a thriving art scene, centered around the state's cosmopolitan urban centers. Once a Spanish colony claimed by 16th-century conquistadores, New Mexico remains the home of a large Spanish-speaking population and plenty of historical places to visit. The state also contains many Native American communities, sheltering a traditional way of life irretrievably lost in most other places in the country. With large tracts of sparsely inhabited land, the state is a great vacation destination for those who want to discover one of the world's last truly untamed regions, interspersed by only a few ancient pueblos and centuries-old missionary churches.

Texas travel guide

4.2
Specialty Museums · Historic Sites · Shopping
The Lone Star State
Thanks to its size and geologic features, Texas contains diverse landscapes that closely resemble both the south and southwest of the United States. Though most people associate Texas with tracts of barren land, deserts cover only about 10 percent of the state, with most of its big population centers located in areas once covered by prairies, grasslands, and forests. As you travel from one end of Texas to the other, observe the changing terrain that ranges from coastal piney woods and swamps in the east to the mountains of the west, with rolling plains and rugged hills in the center. For a bit of urban sightseeing visit some of the state's large cities such as Houston, Dallas, or Austin, or immerse yourself in the nation's history by adding famous attractions like The Alamo to your itinerary. Take plenty of time to mingle with the locals, famous for their hospitality, generosity, and fiercely independent spirit.