20 days in Continental USA Itinerary

20 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States trip itinerary maker
Make it your trip
Fly to Washington Dulles International Airport, Drive to Davis
1
Davis
— 2 nights
Drive to Washington Dulles International Airport, Fly to Asheville
2
Asheville
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Charleston
— 2 nights
Fly
4
Orange Beach
— 2 nights
Drive
5
New Orleans
— 4 nights
Drive
6
Natchez
— 1 night
Taxi to Alexandria, Fly to Page
7
Page
— 2 nights
Drive
8
Sedona
— 3 nights
Drive to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Fly to Zagreb

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Davis — 2 nights

Davis is a town in Tucker County, West Virginia, along the Blackwater River. Kick off your visit on the 2nd (Wed): ski along the peaceful trails at White Grass Touring and Cafe and then admire the verdant scenery at Canaan Valley Resort State Park. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: immerse yourself in nature at Seneca Rocks and then have some family-friendly fun at Seneca Rocks Mountain Guides.

To find more things to do, photos, maps, and other tourist information, refer to the Davis day trip site.

Zagreb, Croatia to Davis is an approximately 19.5-hour combination of flight and car. The time zone difference moving from Central European Standard Time (CET) to Eastern Standard Time (EST) is minus 6 hours. In March in Davis, expect temperatures between 14°C during the day and 0°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 3rd (Thu) so you can travel to Asheville.
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Nature · Outdoors · Parks · Winter Sports
Side Trip

Asheville — 2 nights

Asheville nestles between two major mountain ranges in the scenic western section of North Carolina.
On the 4th (Fri), take in the exciting artwork at New Morning Gallery, discover the riches below the earth's surface at Elijah Mountain Gem Mine and Goat Farm, and then stroll through DuPont State Recreational Forest. On the 5th (Sat), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: indulge in some culinary diversions at a local gastronomic tour, then sample some tasty brews at BREW-ed, then take in the exciting artwork at Woolworth Walk, and finally take in the exciting artwork at Lexington Glassworks.

To see ratings, photos, reviews, and other tourist information, go to the Asheville trip itinerary planning tool.

Getting from Davis to Asheville by car takes about 7.5 hours. Other options: do a combination of car and flight. In March, daytime highs in Asheville are 17°C, while nighttime lows are 2°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 5th (Sat) so you can go by car to Charleston.
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Tours · Nature · Museums · Wildlife
Side Trips

Charleston — 2 nights

Many visitors describe their Charleston holiday as a warm embrace by an old, dear friend--who lived about 200 years ago.
Kick off your visit on the 6th (Sun): take an in-depth tour of Nathaniel Russell House, then take in nature's colorful creations at Battery & White Point Gardens, then hit the best photo ops around with an inspiring photography tour, and finally get outside with Outdoor Activities. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: get engrossed in the history at Fort Sumter National Monument, then glide peacefully along the water with some of the best stand-up paddleboarding in the area, and then get thoroughly spooked out with a ghost and vampire tour.

Plan my day in Charleston using traveler tips and tourist information provided by Inspirock.

You can drive from Asheville to Charleston in 4.5 hours. Other options are to do a combination of bus and flight; or take a bus. Plan for somewhat warmer temperatures traveling from Asheville in March, with highs in Charleston at 22°C and lows at 9°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 7th (Mon) so you can fly to Orange Beach.
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Tours · Museums · Historic Sites · Outdoors

Orange Beach — 2 nights

Orange Beach exists solely as a tourist beach town, with a permanent population of less than 6,000.
Start off your visit on the 8th (Tue): hike along Hugh S. Branyon Backcountry Trail - Rosemary Dunes Trailhead and then kick back and relax at Gulf State Park. Here are some ideas for day two: hike along Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, kick back and relax at Alabama Point East, and then get up close to creatures of the deep with a dolphin and whale watching tour.

To see more things to do, ratings, and more tourist information, read our Orange Beach road trip planning tool.

Traveling by flight from Charleston to Orange Beach takes 5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of bus and taxi. Due to the time zone difference, you'll gain 1 hour traveling from Charleston to Orange Beach. In March, daily temperatures in Orange Beach can reach 24°C, while at night they dip to 12°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 9th (Wed) so you can drive to New Orleans.
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Outdoors · Parks · Nature · Beaches
Side Trip

New Orleans — 4 nights

Known for its Creole cuisine, rich musical tradition, and nearby swamps and plantations, New Orleans is one of the nation's oldest cities.
New Orleans is known for historic sites, nightlife, and museums. Your trip includes some of its best attractions: see the interesting displays at The National WWII Museum, observe the fascinating underwater world at Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, take in the history at Chalmette National Historical Park, and stroll around New Orleans City Park.

To see photos, other places to visit, where to stay, and other tourist information, go to the New Orleans road trip site.

Traveling by car from Orange Beach to New Orleans takes 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of car and bus; or do a combination of taxi and bus. Traveling from Orange Beach in March, expect nights in New Orleans to be somewhat warmer, around 19°C, while days are little chillier, around 19°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 13th (Sun) so you can drive to Natchez.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Nature

Natchez — 1 night

Natchez is the county seat and only city of Adams County, Mississippi, United States. Start off your visit on the 14th (Mon): pause for some serene contemplation at St. Mary Basilica.

For maps, reviews, more things to do, and other tourist information, refer to the Natchez road trip tool.

Traveling by car from New Orleans to Natchez takes 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of train and car. Expect a bit warmer weather when traveling from New Orleans in March: highs in Natchez hover around 24°C, while lows dip to 10°C. On the 14th (Mon), wrap the sightseeing up by early afternoon so you can travel to Page.
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Historic Sites
Highlights from your trip

Page — 2 nights

Originally little more than a simple camp constructed to house workers who built a nearby dam on the Colorado River, Page is now a popular stop for travelers preparing a trip to Arizona's canyon country.
Kick off your visit on the 15th (Tue): contemplate the long history of Navajo Bridge and then tour the pleasant surroundings at Horseshoe Bend. Keep things going the next day: hit the best photo ops around with an inspiring photography tour, then explore the stunning scenery at Antelope Canyon, and then surround yourself with nature on a nature and wildlife tour.

For traveler tips, other places to visit, reviews, and more tourist information, go to the Page trip planner.

Do a combination of taxi and flight from Natchez to Page in 11 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of taxi, bus, and car. You'll gain 1 hour traveling from Natchez to Page due to the time zone difference. Plan for slightly colder nights when traveling from Natchez in March since evenings lows in Page dip to 6°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 16th (Wed) early enough to drive to Sedona.
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Nature · Parks · Outdoors · Tours
Side Trip

Sedona — 3 nights

Despite its relatively small size, Sedona overflows with tourist appeal.
Take a break from the city and head to Off-Road Tours and Cathedral Rock. When in Sedona, make a side trip to see Arizona Copper Art Museum in Clarkdale, approximately Clarkdale away. The adventure continues: hike along Bear Mountain Trail, indulge in some personalized pampering at some of the best spas, tour the pleasant surroundings at Broken Arrow Trail, and explore the striking landscape at Bell Rock.

To find traveler tips, more things to do, photos, and tourist information, go to the Sedona road trip website.

Getting from Page to Sedona by car takes about 3.5 hours. Other options: drive; or do a combination of flight and bus; or do a combination of taxi and bus. In March, daytime highs in Sedona are 22°C, while nighttime lows are 8°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 19th (Sat) to allow enough time to fly back home.
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Parks · Outdoors · Nature · Trails
Side Trip

West Virginia travel guide

4
Historic Sites · State Parks · Zipline
The Mountain State
Located entirely within the Appalachian Mountain region, the aptly nicknamed "Mountain State" represents the highest state east of the Mississippi River with an average elevation of about 460 m (1,500 ft) above sea level. With an official motto of "Mountaineers are always free," West Virginia is home to a fiercely independent people, proud of their state's rich natural resources, physical beauty, and traditional culture. The state is often overlooked by tourists, and its major attractions retain an off-the-beaten-path character and exemplify a laid-back pace of life. West Virginians like to describe their part of the country as both wild and wonderful, a claim you can easily test on a holiday here by filling your itinerary with exploration of the state's green mountains, white-water rivers, and historical small towns.
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North Carolina Mountains travel guide

4.5
History Museums · Zipline · River Rafting & Tubing
Called the "Land of the Blue Mist" by the Cherokee Indians, the North Carolina Smoky Mountains are one of the world's most biologically diverse wilderness areas. The vast national park sheltering the native wildlife of these ancient mountains offers a close look at the area's nature and its people. A perfect spot for a tranquil vacation, the blue-misted mountains are one of the country's few World Heritage Sites, protecting the largest old-growth forest east of the Mississippi River. Things to do for adventurous visitors include whitewater rafting and river tubing, while those interested in more urbane entertainment can explore the area's many small towns on the 750 km (470 mi) scenic road meandering over the mountains.
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South Carolina travel guide

4.3
Dolphin & Whale Watching · Gardens · Beaches
The Palmetto State
Composed of five distinct geographic regions with boundaries roughly parallel to the Atlantic coastline, South Carolina embraces rich history, scenic beauty, and outstanding cuisine. Originally established as a slave society dependent on the cultivation of rice and indigo, the state now boasts a diverse economy that includes massive production of textile goods, chemical products, machinery, and automobiles. Widely regarded as the beginning of the Deep South, the state remains a deeply conservative part of the country, fervently clinging to its religious and cultural traditions. South Carolinians are kind and open hosts to those who vacation here, eager to share the wealth of their cultural heritage with curious visitors. With many remarkable places to visit like Charleston and Hilton Head, your itinerary here is sure to be diverse and full of scenic attractions.
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Alabama travel guide

4.3
History Museums · Military Museums · Specialty Museums
Heart of Dixie
Known as a focal point of the civil rights struggle in the 1960s, Alabama features diverse landscapes that include tall mountains, rolling hills, and gentle plains. Though still largely undiscovered by foreign visitors, Alabama offers tourists a chance to discover the distinct culture of the Deep South. In addition to well-preserved examples of antebellum architecture, this area also boasts an outstanding local cuisine, famous for traditional barbecue recipes passed down from generation to generation. Looking for outdoorsy things to do? Nature lovers on holiday can explore the state's beaches, rugged canyons, and lush river valleys.
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Louisiana travel guide

4.3
Historic Walking Areas · Nightlife · Military Museums
The Pelican State
With a landscape of deltas, marshes, and swamps formed by the sediments of the Mississippi River, Louisiana is home to rich native plant and animal life, including rare species of tree frogs, ibis, and egrets. The state's urban areas, most notably the historical city of New Orleans, are some of its most popular attractions and boast a varied multicultural and multilingual heritage, strongly influenced by a mix of French, Spanish, Native American, and African cultures. Native Louisianans proudly cling to their distinctive dialects and musical traditions, offering visitors a chance to explore one of the most culturally diverse areas in North America. The homeland of both Cajun and Creole cuisines, Louisiana remains a top holiday destination for foodies from around the world.
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Mississippi travel guide

3.4
Casinos · Historic Sites · History Museums
The Magnolia State
Still relatively unspoiled by mass tourism, Mississippi epitomizes rich history and offers warm hospitality to those who vacation here. The Mississippi River forms most of its western border, so it's no surprise that this mighty waterway shapes the lives of people calling the "Magnolia State" their home. The river influences everything from the food they eat to the music they listen to. Perhaps the easiest way to discover Mississippi is to take a drive on the 715 km (444 mi) long national parkway, which follows a route used since pre-colonial times that's famous for its scenic beauty and attractions of historical interest. At the end of the parkway sits a town packed with nearly 600 antebellum homes.
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Arizona travel guide

4.3
Canyons · Hiking Trails · Lookouts
The Grand Canyon State
Known as the "Grand Canyon State," Arizona boasts dense forests, deep gorges, sprawling national parks, and modern ski resorts. Native American reservations take up about a quarter of the state, housing several tribes and offering visitors a chance to discover the varied cultures of the country's indigenous population. A patchwork of diverse tourist attractions, Arizona features exclusive golf courses and upscale shops, as well as cactus-covered canyons and stretches of desolate desert straight out of old Westerns, perfect for a vacation far from the city bustle. Though the state still clings to its Old West flavor, its busy college towns packed with young students from around the world exude a cosmopolitan atmosphere.
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