33 days in Continental USA Itinerary

33 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States holiday builder

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Glacier National Park
— 3 nights
Fly
2
Omaha
— 1 night
Fly
3
Minneapolis
— 1 night
Fly
4
Traverse City
— 1 night
Fly
5
Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island
— 2 nights
Drive
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North Conway
— 2 nights
Drive
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Portland
— 2 nights
Drive
8
Boston
— 2 nights
Fly
9
New York City
— 3 nights
Drive
10
Cape May
— 2 nights
Drive
11
Baltimore
— 1 night
Fly
12
Louisville
— 1 night
Fly
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New Orleans
— 2 nights
Drive
14
Vicksburg
— 1 night
Fly
15
Branson
— 2 nights
Fly
16
Santa Fe
— 2 nights
Drive
17
Albuquerque
— 1 night
Fly
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Las Vegas
— 3 nights

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Glacier National Park

— 3 nights

Crown of the Continent

The glaciers from which Glacier National Park takes its name mostly dissipated eons ago, but they left behind a scoured landscape of high and steep mountain peaks, sparkling lakes, lush alpine meadows, and thick forests.
Take a break from the city and head to Logan Pass and Fishercap Lake. You'll discover tucked-away gems like Grinnell Glacier and McDonald Creek. There's much more to do: trek along Cracker Lake Hike, stroll through Highline Trail, contemplate the waterfront views at Bullhead Lake, and take some stellar pictures from Jackson Glacier Overlook.

For where to stay, maps, reviews, and more tourist information, use the Glacier National Park trip planner.

San Francisco to Glacier National Park is an approximately 4-hour flight. You can also drive; or do a combination of bus and car. You'll lose 1 hour traveling from San Francisco to Glacier National Park due to the time zone difference. When traveling from San Francisco in July, plan for somewhat warmer days and slightly colder nights in Glacier National Park: temperatures range from 85°F by day to 49°F at night. Wrap up your sightseeing by early afternoon on the 3rd (Mon) to allow time for the flight to Omaha.

Things to do in Glacier National Park

Parks · Nature · Outdoors · Trails

Omaha

— 1 night

Gateway to the West

A major transportation hub, Omaha was once considered little more than a stopping point on a pioneer's journey west.
Start off your visit on the 4th (Tue): take an in-depth tour of The Durham Museum, get up close and personal with brilliant marine life at Henry Doorly Zoo, and then shop like a local with Old Market.

To see traveler tips, reviews, maps, and tourist information, read our Omaha road trip planning tool.

You can fly from Glacier National Park to Omaha in 6.5 hours. Other options are to drive; or do a combination of car and bus. Traveling from Glacier National Park to Omaha, you'll lose 1 hour due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Glacier National Park in August, Omaha is somewhat warmer at night with lows of 65°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 4th (Tue) to allow time to fly to Minneapolis.

Things to do in Omaha

Zoos & Aquariums · Nightlife · Parks · Neighborhoods

Minneapolis

— 1 night

The City of Lakes

Located on both banks of the Mississippi River, Minneapolis salutes the state's love of the outdoors with numerous lakes, wetlands, creeks, and waterfalls--many connected to one another by a national scenic byway great for sightseeing.
Start off your visit on the 5th (Wed): get engrossed in the history at Mill City Museum, then have some family-friendly fun at The Escape Game, and then browse the different shops at Mall of America.

To find reviews, traveler tips, ratings, and tourist information, go to the Minneapolis tour app.

Traveling by flight from Omaha to Minneapolis takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In August, daytime highs in Minneapolis are 81°F, while nighttime lows are 64°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 5th (Wed) to allow enough time to fly to Traverse City.

Things to do in Minneapolis

Shopping · Museums · Fun & Games

Side Trip

Traverse City

— 1 night

Cherry Capital of the World

Traverse City might be well known for its huge cherry industry, but its position along Grand Traverse Bay in Lake Michigan endows it with fine scenery and a wealth of outdoor attractions.
Start off your visit on the 6th (Thu): buy something for everyone on your list at The Village at Grand Traverse Commons.

To see traveler tips, other places to visit, maps, and tourist information, go to the Traverse City online trip itinerary maker.

Traveling by flight from Minneapolis to Traverse City takes 5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. Due to the time zone difference, you'll lose 1 hour traveling from Minneapolis to Traverse City. In August, daytime highs in Traverse City are 79°F, while nighttime lows are 60°F. On the 6th (Thu), wrap the sightseeing up by early afternoon so you can fly to Bar Harbor.

Things to do in Traverse City

Historic Sites · Shopping

Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island

— 2 nights
Bar Harbor is a town on Mount Desert Island in Hancock County, Maine, United States. On the 7th (Fri), take a memorable drive along Park Loop Road, contemplate the waterfront views at Jordan Pond Path Trailhead, and then hike along Ocean Path. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: take your sightseeing to a higher altitude at Cadillac Mountain, take a tour by water with Boat Tours & Water Sports, and then tour the pleasant surroundings at Shore Path.

For where to stay, photos, other places to visit, and tourist information, use the Bar Harbor trip itinerary planning tool.

Fly from Traverse City to Bar Harbor in 7 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. Expect a daytime high around 75°F in August, and nighttime lows around 57°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 8th (Sat) to allow time to drive to North Conway.

Things to do in Bar Harbor

Parks · Outdoors · Nature · Wildlife

Side Trip

North Conway

— 2 nights
North Conway combines colonial New England architecture with outlet shops selling goods from some of the world's most recognizable brands, all set amid the scenery of the White Mountains.
Start off your visit on the 9th (Sun): find something for the whole family at Story Land, explore and take pictures at Mt. Washington Auto Road, and then take in the dramatic scenery at Glen Ellis Falls. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 10th (Mon): look and learn at Mount Washington Observatory Weather Discovery Center, take in the dramatic scenery at Diana's Baths, and then cruise along Kancamagus Highway.

To see ratings, photos, more things to do, and tourist information, you can read our North Conway trip site.

You can drive from Bar Harbor to North Conway in 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of bus and car; or do a combination of flight and bus. In August, daily temperatures in North Conway can reach 75°F, while at night they dip to 59°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 10th (Mon) to allow time to drive to Portland.

Things to do in North Conway

Outdoors · Scenic Drive · Nature · Parks

Side Trips

Portland

— 2 nights

The Forest City

Maine's biggest and perhaps most vibrant city, Portland was established as a fishing village in 1633 and grew to become New England's largest port.
Kick off your visit on the 11th (Tue): admire the masterpieces at Portland Museum of Art, then visit a coastal fixture at Portland Head Light, and then take a stroll through Old Port. On the 12th (Wed), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: explore the striking landscape at Perkins Cove, appreciate the extensive heritage of Marginal Way Walkway, and then kick back and relax at Ogunquit Beach.

To see ratings, reviews, where to stay, and more tourist information, refer to the Portland vacation maker app.

You can drive from North Conway to Portland in 2 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of taxi and bus. August in Portland sees daily highs of 79°F and lows of 59°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 12th (Wed) to allow enough time to drive to Boston.

Things to do in Portland

Parks · Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Nature

Side Trips

Boston

— 2 nights

Beantown

Rich in museums, restaurants, shops, and historical sites, Boston attracts over 16 million visitors each year. New England's largest and most influential city, Boston ranks among the world's major centers of education and culture.
Start off your visit on the 13th (Thu): stroll around Boston Public Garden, get a taste of the local shopping with Faneuil Hall Marketplace, then take an in-depth tour of Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum, and finally take in the architecture and atmosphere at Old North Church & Historic Site. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: take a stroll through North End, then get engrossed in the history at USS Constitution Museum, and then get engrossed in the history at Plimoth Patuxet.

For other places to visit, ratings, where to stay, and tourist information, you can read our Boston trip planner.

Drive from Portland to Boston in 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Traveling from Portland in August, expect a bit warmer with lows of 65°F in Boston. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 14th (Fri) early enough to fly to New York City.

Things to do in Boston

Museums · Historic Sites · Parks · Neighborhoods

Side Trip

New York City

— 3 nights

Big Apple

Writer Pearl Buck once called New York City “a place apart,” and this giant urban center remains unlike any other in the world.
Head to SoHo and Chelsea Marketfor plenty of shopping. The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Dumbo are good opportunities to explore the local culture. The adventure continues: examine the collection at Ground Zero Museum Workshop, pause for some serene contemplation at St. Patrick's Cathedral, take in the spiritual surroundings of St. Paul's Chapel, and steep yourself in history at 9/11 Memorial.

For traveler tips, where to stay, ratings, and other tourist information, use the New York City tour itinerary planner.

Fly from Boston to New York City in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a train. Traveling from Boston in August, plan for somewhat warmer nights in New York City, with lows around 71°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 17th (Mon) early enough to go by car to Cape May.

Things to do in New York City

Museums · Neighborhoods · Historic Sites · Tours

Side Trip

Cape May

— 2 nights

The Nation's Oldest Seashore Resort

Cape May represents the other Jersey Shore--the one you don't see on TV--the one with a rich history and a refined, relaxed atmosphere.
Kick off your visit on the 18th (Tue): kick back and relax at North Wildwood Beach, then visit a coastal fixture at Cape May Lighthouse, and then enjoy the sand and surf at Cape May City Beaches. Here are some ideas for day two: enjoy the sand and surf at Wildwood Beach and then get a taste of the local shopping with Wildwood Boardwalk.

For reviews, traveler tips, other places to visit, and tourist information, refer to the Cape May itinerary builder website.

Drive from New York City to Cape May in 3 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or do a combination of train, tram, and bus. Traveling from New York City in August, you can expect nighttime temperatures to be little chillier in Cape May, with lows of 66°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 19th (Wed) early enough to go by car to Baltimore.

Things to do in Cape May

Beaches · Outdoors · Parks · Theme Parks

Side Trips

Baltimore

— 1 night

City of Firsts

A major center for tourism and travel, Baltimore is famous as the city where amateur poet Francis Scott Key wrote the lyrics for the United States' national anthem.
Kick off your visit on the 20th (Thu): explore the striking landscape of Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine and then wander the streets of Fell's Point.

For maps, more things to do, traveler tips, and tourist information, use the Baltimore online trip itinerary maker.

You can drive from Cape May to Baltimore in 3 hours. Other options are to take a bus; or do a combination of bus and train. In August, daily temperatures in Baltimore can reach 86°F, while at night they dip to 71°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 20th (Thu) to allow time to fly to Louisville.

Things to do in Baltimore

Historic Sites · Nature · Parks · Neighborhoods

Louisville

— 1 night

Derby City

Kentucky’s largest city, Louisville, is best known as the home of the Kentucky Derby.
On the 21st (Fri), see the interesting displays at Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory, examine the collection at Kentucky Derby Museum, and then try to win big at Churchill Downs.

To see photos, more things to do, other places to visit, and tourist information, refer to the Louisville itinerary planner.

Traveling by flight from Baltimore to Louisville takes 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. August in Louisville sees daily highs of 86°F and lows of 68°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 21st (Fri) to allow enough time to fly to New Orleans.

Things to do in Louisville

Museums · Historic Sites · Casinos · Fun & Games

New Orleans

— 2 nights

The Big Easy

Known for its Creole cuisine, rich musical tradition, and nearby swamps and plantations, New Orleans is one of the nation's oldest cities.
Kick off your visit on the 22nd (Sat): appreciate the extensive heritage of Garden District, see the interesting displays at Blaine Kern's Mardi Gras World, then see the interesting displays at Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, and finally take in the architecture and atmosphere at St. Louis Cathedral. On the 23rd (Sun), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: partake in some friendly competition at Clue Carre - New Orleans' First Live Escape Game, then brush up on your military savvy at The National WWII Museum, then take a stroll through Royal Street, and finally get to know the fascinating history of Jackson Square.

For ratings, reviews, other places to visit, and other tourist information, read New Orleans trip itinerary planner.

You can fly from Louisville to New Orleans in 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. You'll gain 1 hour traveling from Louisville to New Orleans due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Louisville in August, New Orleans is a bit warmer at night with lows of 82°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Sun) so you can go by car to Vicksburg.

Things to do in New Orleans

Museums · Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Fun & Games

Vicksburg

— 1 night
Vicksburg is the only city and county seat of Warren County, Mississippi, United States. Start off your visit on the 24th (Mon): take an in-depth tour of U.S.S. Cairo Museum and then take in the history at Texas Monument.

To see reviews, photos, ratings, and other tourist information, go to the Vicksburg trip itinerary planner.

You can drive from New Orleans to Vicksburg in 4 hours. Other options are to fly; or do a combination of train and bus. While traveling from New Orleans, expect a bit warmer days and little chillier nights in Vicksburg, ranging from highs of 91°F to lows of 72°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Mon) early enough to fly to Branson.

Things to do in Vicksburg

Parks · Museums · Historic Sites

Branson

— 2 nights

Live Entertainment Capital of the World

Nestled in Missouri's beautiful Ozark Mountains lies one of the country's most attractive vacation towns for year-round family entertainment.
Kick off your visit on the 25th (Tue): contemplate the waterfront views at Table Rock Lake, stroll through Shepherd of the Hills Fish Hatchery, and then explore the galleries of Titanic Museum. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 26th (Wed): stroll around Dogwood Canyon Nature Park, get great views at College of the Ozarks, and then buy something for everyone on your list at Branson Landing.

To see ratings, other places to visit, where to stay, and more tourist information, refer to the Branson trip itinerary maker site.

Fly from Vicksburg to Branson in 6 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In August, Branson is slightly colder than Vicksburg - with highs of 85°F and lows of 66°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 26th (Wed) to allow enough time to fly to Santa Fe.

Things to do in Branson

Parks · Wildlife · Nature · Shopping

Side Trips

Santa Fe

— 2 nights

City Different

Santa Fe continuously ranks among the world's top holiday destinations, attracting visitors with its unusual combination of scenic beauty, rich history, cultural diversity, and high concentration of performing arts venues, fine restaurants, and interesting attractions.
Start off your visit on the 27th (Thu): see the interesting displays at Museum of International Folk Art, visit Canyon Road, and then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Loretto Chapel. Keep things going the next day: appreciate the history behind New Mexico History Museum, explore the world behind art at Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, then make a trip to Santa Fe Plaza, and finally pause for some serene contemplation at The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi.

For reviews, ratings, and other tourist information, read Santa Fe trip maker tool.

Traveling by flight from Branson to Santa Fe takes 6.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. Due to the time zone difference, you'll gain 1 hour traveling from Branson to Santa Fe. Expect little chillier evenings in Santa Fe when traveling from Branson in August, with lows around 57°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 28th (Fri) early enough to drive to Albuquerque.

Things to do in Santa Fe

Historic Sites · Museums · Neighborhoods · Tours

Albuquerque

— 1 night

Duke City

Albuquerque remains one of the state's secret jewels, as its tourist attractions are often overshadowed by the more popular holiday destination of Santa Fe.
On the 29th (Sat), browse the exhibits of New Mexico Steam Locomotive and Railroad Historical Society, then get a new perspective on nature at Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, then explore the striking landscape at Petroglyph National Monument, and finally explore the engaging exhibits at Explora Science Center and Children's Museum of Albuquerque.

For other places to visit, where to stay, traveler tips, and more tourist information, refer to the Albuquerque planner.

You can drive from Santa Fe to Albuquerque in an hour. Other options are to take a bus; or take a train. Plan for a bit warmer nights when traveling from Santa Fe in August since evenings lows in Albuquerque dip to 64°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 29th (Sat) early enough to catch the flight to Las Vegas.

Things to do in Albuquerque

Museums · Childrens Museums · Nature · Parks

Las Vegas

— 3 nights

Sin City

Nicknamed the "Entertainment Capital of the World," Las Vegas sits in the middle of a desert in the southern section of Nevada.
Get in touch with nature at Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area and Off-Road Tours. For shopping fun, head to The Strip or The Grand Canal Shoppes at The Venetian Resort. There's still lots to do: examine the collection at The Mob Museum, enjoy breathtaking views from Eiffel Tower Viewing Deck, take in nature's colorful creations at Bellagio Conservatory & Botanical Gardens, and get engrossed in the history at Titanic.

To see more things to do, where to stay, maps, and other tourist information, use the Las Vegas road trip planning tool.

Fly from Albuquerque to Las Vegas in 3 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of train and shuttle. The time zone difference when traveling from Albuquerque to Las Vegas is minus 1 hour. Plan for a bit warmer temperatures traveling from Albuquerque in August, with highs in Las Vegas at 101°F and lows at 77°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 1st (Tue) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in Las Vegas

Shopping · Museums · Parks · Neighborhoods

Montana travel guide

4.7
River Rafting & Tubing · Bodies of Water · Nature & Parks
The Crown of the Continent
With a population of only one million, Montana remains an untouched natural paradise of snowcapped peaks, expansive forests, and alpine lakes, dotted with Old West ghost towns, Indian reservations, and progressive urban communities. Appreciate the state's unique charm and beauty with a trip to Glacier National Park, where you can come face-to-face with Montana wildlife among its high peaks. Head to the state's largest cities, Billings and Missoula, for an array of historical attractions and cultural sightseeing.

Nebraska travel guide

4.6
Aquariums · Shopping · History Museums
The Cornhusker State
Situated in the heartland of America, Nebraska is home to a large number of small rural communities and masses of farmland. The state's two main cities, Omaha and Lincoln, are abuzz with youthful energy and cultural delights. Your itinerary can include a trip to the cities' museums to learn about the state's past, or tours of the area's important pioneer and Native American sites. The state's central location means that it has been crossed by many trails, but it was the California Gold Rush of 1848-1855 that originally brought large numbers of non-indigenous people to the area. Scenic river valleys offer plenty of opportunities for outdoor vacation activities, while Nebraska's agricultural towns charm visitors with their all-American spirit.

Minnesota travel guide

4.4
Room Escape Games · History Museums · Shopping Malls
The Land of 10,000 Lakes
Deriving its name from the Dakota word for "land of sky-tinted water," Minnesota is a land of pristine lakes, pockets of dense green forests, and sprawling prairieland. Spend your vacation exploring the state's diverse landscape for endless outdoor activity and a chance to see some of the area's national monuments, or take a trip to the bustling St. Paul-Minneapolis area, a network of commerce and cultural attractions, including the famous Mall of America.

Michigan travel guide

4.7
Specialty Museums · Gift & Specialty Shops · State Parks
Great Lakes State
A state inextricably tied to its waterways, Michigan does water activities better than almost any other place in the country. Things to do in the state include numerous opportunities to swim, fish, sail, motorboat, and canoe. The country's only state to stretch over two peninsulas, Michigan features a long freshwater coastline. In a land of nearly 65,000 inland lakes and ponds, you can never be too far from a natural water source. Michigan's major claim to fame is its status as the center of the U.S. automotive industry, with the Detroit metropolitan area housing the country's three major car manufacturers. The city is also a major center of culture, the birthplace of the Motown Sound, and the home of several museums and other tourist attractions. Farther from the big urban centers, Michigan offers visitors a world of apple and cherry orchards, rustic villages, and picturesque vineyards.

Maine travel guide

4.6
Beaches · Lighthouses · Mountains
The Pine Tree State
The easternmost state in New England, Maine features an indented coastline and forested interior, carved eons ago by receding glaciers. Maine includes more lighthouses and quaint resort villages than you could ever hope to explore in a single trip, but the state is also one of the country's most sparsely populated, the majority of its land pristine and uninhabited wilderness. The temperate coastal regions, historically supported by fishing and lobstering, contain most of the state's urban centers and are the most popular spots in the state for holidays. The sea is the focus here, so it shouldn't come as a surprise that water plays an important role in the distinct character of the state, shaping its economy, tourism, cuisine, politics, sports, and art.

New Hampshire travel guide

4.6
Waterfalls · Ski Areas · Theme Parks
The Granite State
One of the country's smallest and least populous states, New Hampshire's wealth of recreational offerings make it a popular vacation destination. Its many pristine natural areas attract skiers, snowmobilers, hikers, and mountaineers from around the world. Named after a county in England, New Hampshire was the first of the North American colonies to establish a government independent of Great Britain's authority. Though New Hampshire's official nickname refers to its extensive granite formations and quarries, the state's license plates carry the motto "Live Free or Die," reflecting the sense of independence prized by the famously terse natives. Find out why America's artists continue to find inspiration in New Hampshire by taking a trip to its quaint villages and sightseeing in the area's old colonial towns.

Massachusetts travel guide

4.3
History Museums · Art Museums · Historic Walking Areas
The Bay State
Known as the "Bay State" because of the three bays dominating its coastline, Massachusetts has played a significant cultural and commercial role through most of the country's history. An increasingly popular vacation destination for foreign travelers, Massachusetts offers numerous places to visit, ranging from historical sites to modern urban centers famous for their culinary, art, and nightlife scenes. With the majority of its population living in and around the city of Boston, in the 20th century Massachusetts went from a state largely dependent on fishing and agriculture to the country's leader in higher education, healthcare, high technology, and financial services. Home to renowned universities and research centers, the state's cities attract a young crowd of students, scientists, artists, and business professionals.

New Jersey travel guide

3.9
Casinos · Shopping Malls · Beaches
The Garden State
Often overshadowed by its legendary neighbor, New York, New Jersey holds its own as a land of thriving industrial cities, sprawling farmland, and lively coastal towns. Called the Garden State, New Jersey is a hub of entertainment and cultural attractions for the east coast, from the famous sandy beaches and carnival-like atmosphere of the Jersey Shore to alluring Atlantic City, the Las Vegas of the east. New Jersey also boasts a wealth of historical places to visit, including battle sites and memorials, such as George Washington's Revolutionary War headquarters.

Maryland travel guide

4.1
Casinos · Specialty Museums · Aquariums
The Old Line State
Perhaps best known as the birthplace of religious and political freedom in the United States, Maryland retains the spirit of colonial America, with stately 18th-century villages and historical landmarks. Although it's one of the nation's smallest states, there is no shortage of things to do here and you may find your itinerary fills up quickly. Make time in your vacation to tour Maryland's diverse landscape, which includes mountain peaks, picturesque Atlantic coastline, and the bustling city of Baltimore. Military buffs will enjoy touring the state's four Civil War Trails, where you can follow the footsteps of U.S. soldiers, or visiting the port city of Annapolis, home to the United States Naval Academy.

Kentucky travel guide

4.5
Caves · Specialty Museums · Distilleries
The Bluegrass State
A diverse region of sprawling farmland and rich cultural heritage, Kentucky is the birthplace of American horse racing and home to the world-famous Kentucky Derby. While the cities of Lexington and Louisville experience the majority of the state's tourism, Kentucky is also a favorite among outdoor enthusiasts with its array of natural attractions, including the Cumberland Gap and the world's longest cave system at Mammoth Cave National Park. Take a tour through original Civil War battlefields to delve into the nation's history, or head to one of the many bourbon distilleries to learn more about Kentucky's most famous export.

Louisiana travel guide

4.3
Historic Walking Areas · Nightlife · Military Museums
The Pelican State
With a landscape of deltas, marshes, and swamps formed by the sediments of the Mississippi River, Louisiana is home to rich native plant and animal life, including rare species of tree frogs, ibis, and egrets. The state's urban areas, most notably the historical city of New Orleans, are some of its most popular attractions and boast a varied multicultural and multilingual heritage, strongly influenced by a mix of French, Spanish, Native American, and African cultures. Native Louisianans proudly cling to their distinctive dialects and musical traditions, offering visitors a chance to explore one of the most culturally diverse areas in North America. The homeland of both Cajun and Creole cuisines, Louisiana remains a top holiday destination for foodies from around the world.

Mississippi travel guide

3.4
Casinos · Historic Sites · History Museums
The Magnolia State
Still relatively unspoiled by mass tourism, Mississippi epitomizes rich history and offers warm hospitality to those who vacation here. The Mississippi River forms most of its western border, so it's no surprise that this mighty waterway shapes the lives of people calling the "Magnolia State" their home. The river influences everything from the food they eat to the music they listen to. Perhaps the easiest way to discover Mississippi is to take a drive on the 715 km (444 mi) long national parkway, which follows a route used since pre-colonial times that's famous for its scenic beauty and attractions of historical interest. At the end of the parkway sits a town packed with nearly 600 antebellum homes.

Missouri travel guide

4.6
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.

New Mexico travel guide

4.1
Specialty Museums · Geologic Formations · Historic Walking Areas
Land of Enchantment
New Mexico is a land of distinctive regional cuisine and a thriving art scene, centered around the state's cosmopolitan urban centers. Once a Spanish colony claimed by 16th-century conquistadores, New Mexico remains the home of a large Spanish-speaking population and plenty of historical places to visit. The state also contains many Native American communities, sheltering a traditional way of life irretrievably lost in most other places in the country. With large tracts of sparsely inhabited land, the state is a great vacation destination for those who want to discover one of the world's last truly untamed regions, interspersed by only a few ancient pueblos and centuries-old missionary churches.

Nevada travel guide

4.3
Performances · Fountains · Casinos
The Silver State
The neon streets of Las Vegas represent only one chapter in the story of Nevada, a sparsely populated state offering travelers a chance to discover the country's western frontier. Utterly unlike the more populated parts of the North American continent, Nevada's landscape includes huge deserts where you can easily leave modern civilization behind and enjoy a tranquil vacation. For a taste of untamed Nevada, explore the network of paved and unpaved roads leading to some of the world's most rugged and desolate natural wonders. If trying to make a fortune is high on your itinerary, remember that in the first state to legalize gambling, a slot machine is never too far away. Even gas stations and small motels in the largely deserted rural areas offer some form of gambling to the passing traveler.