4 days in Illinois, Northeast Oklahoma - Green Country & Arkansas Itinerary

4 days in Illinois, Northeast Oklahoma - Green Country & Arkansas Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States trip planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Chicago
— 1 night
Fly
2
Tulsa
— 1 night
Drive
3
Eureka Springs
— 1 night
Fly

S M T W T F S
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Chicago

— 1 night

Windy City

A huge and vibrant city, Chicago is home to top-notch theaters, shops, museums, galleries, and restaurants.
Kick off your visit on the 14th (Wed): admire the local landmark of Buckingham Fountain and then explore the world behind art at The Art Institute of Chicago. On the 15th (Thu), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: take in panoramic vistas at 360 Chicago Observation Deck, then take a memorable tour with Tours, then walk around Millennium Park, and finally don't miss a visit to Skydeck Chicago - Willis Tower.

To see photos, maps, other places to visit, and more tourist information, use the Chicago tour itinerary planner.

New York City to Chicago is an approximately 5.5-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. You'll gain 1 hour traveling from New York City to Chicago due to the time zone difference. Plan for a bit cooler temperatures traveling from New York City in October, with highs in Chicago at 65°F and lows at 49°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 15th (Thu) early enough to travel to Tulsa.

Things to do in Chicago

Tours · Outdoors · Museums · Parks

Tulsa

— 1 night

Buckle of the Bible Belt

Sometimes known as the "Buckle of the Bible Belt," Tulsa is the second largest city in Oklahoma.
Kick off your visit on the 16th (Fri): get outside with Guthrie Green, admire the masterpieces at Philbrook Museum of Art, and then let little ones run wild at Gathering Place.

To find more things to do, ratings, reviews, and other tourist information, read Tulsa trip planner.

You can fly from Chicago to Tulsa in 6 hours. Other options are to drive; or do a combination of train and bus. When traveling from Chicago in October, plan for a bit warmer days in Tulsa, with highs around 76°F, while nights are about the same with lows around 53°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 16th (Fri) so you can go by car to Eureka Springs.

Things to do in Tulsa

Parks · Fun & Games · Outdoors · Museums

Eureka Springs

— 1 night

Little Switzerland of America

Nestled in the heart of the Ozark Mountains, the whole town of Eureka Springs is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Start off your visit on the 17th (Sat): look for all kinds of wild species at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge and then take in the spiritual surroundings of Thorncrown Chapel.

For maps, other places to visit, ratings, and other tourist information, read our Eureka Springs trip app.

Drive from Tulsa to Eureka Springs in 3 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of bus and taxi. When traveling from Tulsa in October, plan for slightly colder days in Eureka Springs, with highs around 71°F, while nights are about the same with lows around 51°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 17th (Sat) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in Eureka Springs

Parks · Wildlife · Historic Sites

Illinois travel guide

4.4
Observation Decks · Parks · Art Museums
The Prairie State
The most populous state in the country's Midwest region, Illinois features a diverse landscape that includes both the enormous urban sprawl of Chicago and flat central plains, devoted almost entirely to farmland. With a great selection of things to do, Chicago is the state's centerpiece, featuring world-famous architecture and renowned museums. Farther away from this giant urban center, you can explore historical landmarks dedicated to local heroes Abraham Lincoln and Ernest Hemingway. The state also includes a prehistoric Native American site, one of only 20 World Heritage Sites in the United States, a unique feature well-worth adding to your itinerary.

Arkansas travel guide

4.4
State Parks · Historic Sites · Art Museums
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.