47 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States journey planner
Make it your trip
Fly
1
Sedona
— 5 nights
Fly
2
Santa Fe
— 5 nights
Fly
3
Oklahoma City
— 3 nights
Drive
4
Branson
— 5 nights
Fly
5
Louisville
— 3 nights
Drive
6
Nashville
— 4 nights
Fly
7
Hot Springs
— 2 nights
Drive
8
Natchez
— 2 nights
Drive
9
Mobile
— 4 nights
Fly
10
Savannah
— 4 nights
Train
11
Charleston
— 4 nights
Drive
12
Asheville
— 2 nights
Drive
13
Pigeon Forge
— 3 nights
Fly

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Sedona — 5 nights

Red Rock Country

Despite its relatively small size, Sedona overflows with tourist appeal.
Eschew the tourist crowds and head to Amitabha Stupa & Peace Park and Palatki Ruins. Do some cultural sightseeing at Arizona Copper Art Museum and Jerome State Historic Park. Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Sedona: Tuzigoot National Monument (in Clarkdale) and Jerome Historical Society Mine Museum (in Jerome). There's lots more to do: hike along Fay Canyon Trail, tour the pleasant surroundings at Doe Mountain Trail, learn about winemaking at Arizona Stronghold Vineyards Tasting Room, and surround yourself with nature on a nature and wildlife tour.

Plan a Sedona trip in moments using our itinerary builder.

Dallas to Sedona is an approximately 4-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. The time zone difference moving from Central Standard Time (CST) to Mountain Standard Time (MST) is minus 1 hour. Traveling from Dallas in March, you can expect nighttime temperatures to be slightly colder in Sedona, with lows of 8°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 4th (Tue) early enough to fly to Santa Fe.
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Parks · Outdoors · Museums · Trails
Side Trips

Santa Fe — 5 nights

City Different

Santa Fe continuously ranks among the world's top holiday destinations, attracting visitors with its unusual combination of scenic beauty, rich history, cultural diversity, and high concentration of performing arts venues, fine restaurants, and interesting attractions.
Step off the beaten path and head to San Miguel Chapel and El Santuario de Chimayo. Get some cultural insight at Museum of Indian Arts & Culture and New Mexico Museum of Art. Get out of town with these interesting Santa Fe side-trips: Los Alamos (Bradbury Science Museum & Los Alamos History Museum) and Jemez Mountains (in Jemez Springs). There's lots more to do: examine the collection at Palace of the Governors, steep yourself in history at La Cieneguilla Petroglyph Site, learn about all things military at New Mexico National Guard Museum, and contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Santuario De Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe.

For traveler tips, reviews, where to stay, and tourist information, refer to the Santa Fe trip planning website.

You can fly from Sedona to Santa Fe in 6.5 hours. Other options are to drive; or do a combination of bus and train. In April, Santa Fe is little chillier than Sedona - with highs of 22°C and lows of 1°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 9th (Sun) to allow enough time to fly to Oklahoma City.
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Museums · Historic Sites · Shopping · Childrens Museums
Side Trips

Oklahoma City — 3 nights

The Big Friendly

Oklahoma City, known to many as the "Big Friendly," represents the political, cultural, and economic engine of the state of Oklahoma.
You'll discover tucked-away gems like National Shrine of the Infant Jesus of Prague and Henry Overholser Mansion. Your inner history buff will appreciate St. Joseph Old Cathedral and St Pauls Episcopal Cathedral. Venture out of the city with trips to Seaba Station Motorcycle Museum (in Chandler), Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art (in Norman) and Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art (in Shawnee). There's still lots to do: make a trip to OK County 66 - John's Place and learn the secrets of beer at a beer tour and tasting.

Plan my day in Oklahoma City using traveler tips and tourist information provided by Inspirock.

You can fly from Santa Fe to Oklahoma City in 5.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. You'll lose 1 hour traveling from Santa Fe to Oklahoma City due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Santa Fe in April, plan for a bit warmer nights in Oklahoma City, with lows around 10°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 12th (Wed) so you can go by car to Branson.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Tours · Breweries & Distilleries
Side Trips

Branson — 5 nights

Live Entertainment Capital of the World

Nestled in Missouri's beautiful Ozark Mountains lies one of the country's most attractive vacation towns for year-round family entertainment.
Visit Wilson's Creek National Battlefield and Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church for their historical value. Get a sense of the local culture at Ancient Ozarks Natural History Museum and VIP Tours of Branson. When in Branson, make a side trip to see Gay Perdita Sinclair Station Route 66 Memorabalia in Ash Grove, approximately Ash Grove away. And it doesn't end there: take an in-depth tour of History of Fishing Museum, stroll around Lakeside Forest Wilderness Area, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at The Shrine of the Holy Spirit, and stop by Silver Anvil Metal Craft.

To see where to stay, reviews, and more tourist information, use the Branson road trip planner.

Drive from Oklahoma City to Branson in 5.5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or do a combination of bus and taxi. April in Branson sees daily highs of 22°C and lows of 9°C at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 17th (Mon) so you can fly to Louisville.
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Historic Sites · Wineries · Museums · Tours
Side Trips

Louisville — 3 nights

Derby City

Kentucky’s largest city, Louisville, is best known as the home of the Kentucky Derby.
Visit Lexington Cemetery and Zachary Taylor National Cemetery for their historical value. You'll discover tucked-away gems like Mill Ridge Farm and Dinosaur World. Venture out of the city with trips to Elizabethtown (Brown-Pusey House & Swope's Cars of Yesteryear Museum), Onyx Cave (in Cave City) and Bluegrass Distillers (in Lexington). And it doesn't end there: sample the fine beverages at Copper & Kings American Brandy Distillery, take an in-depth tour of Locust Grove, explore the world behind art at The Speed Art Museum, and steep yourself in history at Farmington Historic Plantation.

To find more things to do, reviews, where to stay, and other tourist information, you can read our Louisville tour itinerary website.

Getting from Branson to Louisville by flight takes about 6.5 hours. Other options: drive; or take a bus. Due to the time zone difference, you'll lose 1 hour traveling from Branson to Louisville. In April, daily temperatures in Louisville can reach 24°C, while at night they dip to 10°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 20th (Thu) to allow time to drive to Nashville.
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Museums · Historic Sites · Breweries & Distilleries · Parks
Side Trips

Nashville — 4 nights

Music City U.S.A.

Known as the capital of country music, the thriving city of Nashville combines old-world southern charm with a progressive urban flair.
Deepen your sense of the past at sights like Winstead Hill Park and Historic Travellers Rest. Satisfy your inner culture vulture at Historic Mansker's Station and Mt. Olivet Cemetery. You'll find plenty of places to visit near Nashville: Columbia (Chickasaw Trace County Park & President James K. Polk Home & Museum). And it doesn't end there: take in the architecture and atmosphere at Upper Room, get to know the fascinating history of Natchez Trace Parkway, brush up on your knowledge of spirits at Tennessee Legend Distillery, and stroll the grounds of Woodlawn Cemetery.

To find other places to visit, more things to do, and more tourist information, use the Nashville trip itinerary planning tool.

Getting from Louisville to Nashville by car takes about 3 hours. Other options: take a bus; or fly. Due to the time zone difference, you'll gain 1 hour traveling from Louisville to Nashville. April in Nashville sees daily highs of 26°C and lows of 11°C at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Mon) to allow time to fly to Hot Springs.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Tours
Side Trips

Hot Springs — 2 nights

Valley of the Vapors

Set deep in the Ouachita Mountains, the city of Hot Springs almost completely surrounds the national park of the same name.
On the 25th (Tue), stroll through Grand Promenade, learn about winemaking at The Winery of Hot Springs, then admire the majestic nature at Lake Catherine State Park, and finally take in the architecture and atmosphere at Anthony Chapel. On the 26th (Wed), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: stroll the grounds of Mount Holly Cemetery and then steep yourself in history at Old State House Museum.

To find reviews, traveler tips, more things to do, and more tourist information, refer to the Hot Springs trip planner.

Traveling by flight from Nashville to Hot Springs takes 6 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of bus and taxi. Expect a daytime high around 26°C in April, and nighttime lows around 13°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 26th (Wed) early enough to go by car to Natchez.
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Parks · Historic Sites · Museums · Nature
Side Trip

Natchez — 2 nights

Natchez is the county seat and only city of Adams County, Mississippi, United States. Start off your visit on the 27th (Thu): steep yourself in history at Dunleith Historic Inn, steep yourself in history at Auburn Museum & Historic Home, then learn about winemaking at Old South Winery, and finally steep yourself in history at Mount Locust Inn & Plantation. On the next day, admire the landmark architecture of The Towers, see the interesting displays at Delta Music Museum, then admire the masterpieces at Stratton Chapel Gallery, and finally contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Temple B'nai Israel.

To see reviews, other places to visit, more things to do, and tourist information, refer to the Natchez trip itinerary maker.

Getting from Hot Springs to Natchez by car takes about 7 hours. Other options: do a combination of flight and taxi; or do a combination of taxi and bus. April in Natchez sees daily highs of 28°C and lows of 15°C at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 28th (Fri) to allow enough time to drive to Mobile.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Wineries
Side Trip

Mobile — 4 nights

You'll explore the less-touristy side of things at Richards DAR House Museum and Veterans Memorial Park. Get some cultural insight at Historic Oakleigh House and Conde-Charlotte Museum. Get out of town with these interesting Mobile side-trips: Confederate Rest Cemetery (in Point Clear), Pensacola (Barrancas National Cemetery & Downtown Pensacola) and Biloxi (Old Biloxi Cemetery & Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary).

For photos and other tourist information, you can read our Mobile online sightseeing planner.

Traveling by car from Natchez to Mobile takes 5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of car and flight; or do a combination of taxi and flight. April in Mobile sees daily highs of 29°C and lows of 17°C at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 2nd (Tue) early enough to catch the flight to Savannah.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Nature · Parks
Side Trips

Savannah — 4 nights

The Hostess City of the South

Georgia's oldest city, Savannah displays its colonial history proudly on every corner.
Get a sense of the local culture at Davenport House Museum and Pin Point Heritage Museum. The Church of the Cross and Green-Meldrim House will appeal to history buffs. Get out of town with these interesting Savannah side-trips: Mitchelville Freedom Park (in Hilton Head), Old Town Bluffton (in Bluffton) and Beaufort (Pat Conroy Literary Center & The Point). There's much more to do: brush up on your military savvy at Webb Military Museum, examine the collection at Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum, look for gifts at The Salt Table, and deepen your understanding at SCADstory.

To find out how to plan a trip to Savannah, use our trip itinerary maker.

You can fly from Mobile to Savannah in 5.5 hours. Other options are to drive; or take a bus. The time zone difference when traveling from Mobile to Savannah is 1 hour. Expect a daytime high around 33°C in May, and nighttime lows around 20°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 6th (Sat) so you can take a train to Charleston.
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Museums · Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Parks
Side Trips

Charleston — 4 nights

Many visitors describe their Charleston holiday as a warm embrace by an old, dear friend--who lived about 200 years ago.
Get some cultural insight at McLeod Plantation Historic Site and Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim. Discover out-of-the-way places like Fort Moultrie and Edmondston-Alston House. The adventure continues: hit the best photo ops around with an inspiring photography tour, get a new perspective on nature at The Charleston Museum, don't miss a visit to Pineapple Fountain, and contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist.

For reviews, photos, traveler tips, and tourist information, use the Charleston visit website.

Getting from Savannah to Charleston by train takes about 2.5 hours. Other options: drive. Expect a daytime high around 32°C in May, and nighttime lows around 20°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 10th (Wed) to allow time to drive to Asheville.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Tours
Side Trips

Asheville — 2 nights

Land of the Sky

Asheville nestles between two major mountain ranges in the scenic western section of North Carolina.
Start off your visit on the 11th (Thu): take in the spiritual surroundings of Billy Graham Training Center at The Cove, get a taste of the local shopping with Philip DeAngelo Studio, then view the masterpieces at St.Claire Art, and finally do a tasting at Noble Cider. On your second day here, get engrossed in the history at World Methodist Museum, examine the collection at Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts, then admire the masterpieces at Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center, and finally look for gifts at Kress Emporium.

Find out how to plan Asheville trip without stress by asking Inspirock to help create an itinerary.

Traveling by car from Charleston to Asheville takes 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of flight and bus; or take a bus. Expect little chillier temperatures when traveling from Charleston in May; daily highs in Asheville reach 28°C and lows reach 13°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 12th (Fri) so you can drive to Pigeon Forge.
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Museums · Shopping · Historic Sites · Wineries
Side Trips

Pigeon Forge — 3 nights

Center of Fun in the Smokies

A tiny town with big tourist appeal, Pigeon Forge bills itself as the "Center of Fun in the Smokies." Just a short drive from the national park protecting the diverse plant and animal life of the Great Smoky Mountains, the town features numerous places to visit, such as bars, restaurants, cafes, theaters, and shops.
Explore hidden gems such as Fowler's Clay Works and Foothills Parkway Southwest Parking. Get some cultural insight at Wine Tours & Tastings and Little Greenbrier School. The adventure continues: get to know the fascinating history of Noah Bud Ogle Cabin, learn about winemaking at Tennessee Homemade Wines, steep yourself in history at Walker Sisters' Cabin, and sample the fine beverages at Junction 35 Spirits.

To see traveler tips, photos, more things to do, and more tourist information, refer to the Pigeon Forge planning tool.

Drive from Asheville to Pigeon Forge in 2 hours. May in Pigeon Forge sees daily highs of 30°C and lows of 16°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 15th (Mon) so you can catch the flight back home.
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Historic Sites · Museums · Wineries · Tours
Side Trips

Arizona travel guide

4.4
Canyons · Geologic Formations · Hiking Trails
The Grand Canyon State
Known as the "Grand Canyon State," Arizona boasts dense forests, deep gorges, sprawling national parks, and modern ski resorts. Native American reservations take up about a quarter of the state, housing several tribes and offering visitors a chance to discover the varied cultures of the country's indigenous population. A patchwork of diverse tourist attractions, Arizona features exclusive golf courses and upscale shops, as well as cactus-covered canyons and stretches of desolate desert straight out of old Westerns, perfect for a vacation far from the city bustle. Though the state still clings to its Old West flavor, its busy college towns packed with young students from around the world exude a cosmopolitan atmosphere.
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New Mexico travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Geologic Formations · Historic Walking Areas
Land of Enchantment
New Mexico is a land of distinctive regional cuisine and a thriving art scene, centered around the state's cosmopolitan urban centers. Once a Spanish colony claimed by 16th-century conquistadores, New Mexico remains the home of a large Spanish-speaking population and plenty of historical places to visit. The state also contains many Native American communities, sheltering a traditional way of life irretrievably lost in most other places in the country. With large tracts of sparsely inhabited land, the state is a great vacation destination for those who want to discover one of the world's last truly untamed regions, interspersed by only a few ancient pueblos and centuries-old missionary churches.
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Oklahoma travel guide

4
Casinos · Monuments · Art Museums
The Sooner State
Boasting a rich Native American heritage and named after the Choctaw word for "Red People," Oklahoma remains home to about 40 native tribes who speak 25 distinct languages. Though the state remains one of the country's top producers of agricultural products, most of its inhabitants live within two metropolitan areas, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The state is home to the 500-million-year-old Wichita Mountains, noted for being the site of the oldest national wildlife refuge in the United States. Explore the state's pristine natural areas while on vacation here, but be sure to leave plenty of time to tour its characteristic small towns, known for their food, music, and cultural festivals.
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Missouri travel guide

4.4
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.
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Kentucky travel guide

4.6
Caves · Distilleries · Specialty Museums
The Bluegrass State
A diverse region of sprawling farmland and rich cultural heritage, Kentucky is the birthplace of American horse racing and home to the world-famous Kentucky Derby. While the cities of Lexington and Louisville experience the majority of the state's tourism, Kentucky is also a favorite among outdoor enthusiasts with its array of natural attractions, including the Cumberland Gap and the world's longest cave system at Mammoth Cave National Park. Take a tour through original Civil War battlefields to delve into the nation's history, or head to one of the many bourbon distilleries to learn more about Kentucky's most famous export.
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Tennessee travel guide

4.4
Distilleries · Specialty Museums · Historic Sites
The Volunteer State
Divided by law, geography, and custom into three major regions, represented by the three stars on state's flag, Tennessee boasts a distinctive musical heritage that includes elements of bluegrass, country-western, and blues. With a countryside as diverse as its people, Tennessee includes landscapes ranging from a mountainous region in the east to the lowlands of the west, with gently rolling hills in the middle. For a well-rounded vacation, you can hike remote mountain trails in the morning and explore the crowded bars of Nashville in the evening. Visit the urban attractions, such as Elvis Presley's former residence in Memphis, but don't miss a chance to spend some time in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, situated in the eastern part of the state.
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Arkansas travel guide

4.4
State Parks · Art Museums · Historic Sites
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.
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Mississippi travel guide

3.4
Casinos · Historic Sites · History Museums
The Magnolia State
Still relatively unspoiled by mass tourism, Mississippi epitomizes rich history and offers warm hospitality to those who vacation here. The Mississippi River forms most of its western border, so it's no surprise that this mighty waterway shapes the lives of people calling the "Magnolia State" their home. The river influences everything from the food they eat to the music they listen to. Perhaps the easiest way to discover Mississippi is to take a drive on the 715 km (444 mi) long national parkway, which follows a route used since pre-colonial times that's famous for its scenic beauty and attractions of historical interest. At the end of the parkway sits a town packed with nearly 600 antebellum homes.
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Alabama travel guide

4.3
Military Museums · Dolphin & Whale Watching · Historic Sites
Heart of Dixie
Known as a focal point of the civil rights struggle in the 1960s, Alabama features diverse landscapes that include tall mountains, rolling hills, and gentle plains. Though still largely undiscovered by foreign visitors, Alabama offers tourists a chance to discover the distinct culture of the Deep South. In addition to well-preserved examples of antebellum architecture, this area also boasts an outstanding local cuisine, famous for traditional barbecue recipes passed down from generation to generation. Looking for outdoorsy things to do? Nature lovers on holiday can explore the state's beaches, rugged canyons, and lush river valleys.
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Georgia travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Historic Sites · Aquariums
The Peach State
Founded in 1733, Georgia was one of the original 13 colonies that became the United States. Much more geographically diverse than most visitors realize, the state features a scenic seacoast, high mountain peaks, and large urban centers, with broad rural areas in between. Once famous mostly for historical attractions memorializing the Civil War era and the Civil Rights Movement, Georgia now draws tourists from around the world with its rich musical tradition and distinctive cuisine. Start your Georgian adventure in Atlanta, the state's economic powerhouse, and then road trip to the coastal barrier islands, nature preserves, and chic vacation resorts.
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South Carolina travel guide

4.3
Dolphin & Whale Watching · Historic Sites · Gardens
The Palmetto State
Composed of five distinct geographic regions with boundaries roughly parallel to the Atlantic coastline, South Carolina embraces rich history, scenic beauty, and outstanding cuisine. Originally established as a slave society dependent on the cultivation of rice and indigo, the state now boasts a diverse economy that includes massive production of textile goods, chemical products, machinery, and automobiles. Widely regarded as the beginning of the Deep South, the state remains a deeply conservative part of the country, fervently clinging to its religious and cultural traditions. South Carolinians are kind and open hosts to those who vacation here, eager to share the wealth of their cultural heritage with curious visitors. With many remarkable places to visit like Charleston and Hilton Head, your itinerary here is sure to be diverse and full of scenic attractions.
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North Carolina travel guide

4.5
Historic Sites · Specialty Museums · Zipline
The Tar Heel State
A top destination for a holiday in nature, North Carolina provides a seemingly endless variety of outdoor activities, including hiking, mountain climbing, and skiing. While the state's rural regions offer a taste of traditional Appalachian music and culture, its increasingly diverse big cities feature modern skyscrapers, renowned museums, and historical neighborhoods perfect for sightseeing tours. The coastal region, famous for its year-round temperate climate, attracts millions of annual visitors, making North Carolina the sixth most-visited state in the country. Though it's hard to find a quiet time of year in coastal North Carolina, the state's inland areas retain many secluded corners where you can experience the laid-back Old South atmosphere.
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