6 days in Missouri Itinerary

6 days in Missouri Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Missouri vacation maker

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Make it your trip
Drive
1
Fredericktown
— 1 night
Drive
2
Ozark
— 1 day
Drive
3
Lampe
— 2 nights
Drive
4
Noel
— 1 night
Drive

S M T W T F S
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Fredericktown

— 1 night
Fredericktown is a city in and the county seat of Madison County, Missouri, United States, in the northeastern foothills of the St. Kick off your visit on the 12th (Mon): contemplate the long history of Marquand Historic Park and then look for all kinds of wild species at Silver Mines Recreation Area.

For other places to visit, ratings, photos, and more tourist information, go to the Fredericktown road trip planning tool.

Blue Springs to Fredericktown is an approximately 5-hour car ride. You can also do a combination of car and flight. In October, daily temperatures in Fredericktown can reach 70°F, while at night they dip to 48°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 13th (Tue) so you can travel to Ozark.

Things to do in Fredericktown

Parks · Wildlife · Historic Sites

Side Trip

Ozark

— 1 day
Ozark, incorporated in 1890, is a city in Christian County, Missouri, United States. On the 13th (Tue), take in the history at Wilson's Creek National Battlefield, browse the fresh offerings at Heather Hill Farms, then explore the fascinating underground world of Smallin Civil War Cave, and finally get some fabulous bargains at Russell Stover Candies Factory Outlet.

To see more things to do, reviews, traveler tips, and more tourist information, use the Ozark online trip maker.

Traveling by car from Fredericktown to Ozark takes 4 hours. In October, daytime highs in Ozark are 72°F, while nighttime lows are 50°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 13th (Tue) to allow time to drive to Lampe.

Things to do in Ozark

Shopping · Historic Sites · Nature · Parks

Side Trip

Lampe

— 2 nights
Lampe is an unincorporated community in southern Stone County, Missouri, United States. Start off your visit on the 14th (Wed): shop like a local with Cosmic Cavern, relax in the rural setting at Persimmon Hill Farm, and then look for all kinds of wild species at Dogwood Canyon Nature Park. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 15th (Thu): play a few rounds at Top of the Rock Golf Course, then learn more about the world around you at Ancient Ozarks Natural History Museum, and then stroll through Lost Canyon Nature Trail and Cave.

To find reviews, where to stay, photos, and more tourist information, you can read our Lampe travel itinerary planner.

Drive from Ozark to Lampe in an hour. Alternatively, you can drive. In October, daily temperatures in Lampe can reach 72°F, while at night they dip to 51°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 16th (Fri) so you can go by car to Noel.

Things to do in Lampe

Parks · Outdoors · Museums · Wildlife

Side Trips

Noel

— 1 night
Noel is a village in McDonald County, Missouri, United States, along the Elk River. Start off your visit on the 16th (Fri): explore the fascinating underground world of Old Spanish Treasure Cave, explore the fascinating underground world of Bluff Dwellers Cave, and then let the river carry you with a rafting and tubing tour.

To find more things to do, other places to visit, maps, and more tourist information, refer to the Noel itinerary maker website.

Traveling by car from Lampe to Noel takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can drive. Expect a daytime high around 74°F in October, and nighttime lows around 51°F. On the 17th (Sat), you're off to home.

Things to do in Noel

Nature · Parks · Outdoors · Tours

Side Trip

Missouri travel guide

4.6
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.