6 days in Missouri Itinerary

6 days in Missouri Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Missouri trip planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Springfield
— 1 night
Drive
2
Branson
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Hermann
— 1 night
Drive
4
Hannibal
— 1 night
Bus to Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, Fly to Denver

S M T W T F S
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Springfield

— 1 night
Start off your visit on the 6th (Thu): explore the fascinating underground world of Fantastic Caverns.

To find more things to do, ratings, traveler tips, and more tourist information, go to the Springfield attractions planning site.

Denver to Springfield is an approximately 4.5-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. The time zone changes from Mountain Standard Time to Central Standard Time, which is usually a 1 hour difference. Traveling from Denver in August, plan for somewhat warmer nights in Springfield, with lows around 67°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 7th (Fri) to allow time to drive to Branson.

Things to do in Springfield

Parks · Shopping · Wildlife · Nature

Side Trip

Branson

— 2 nights

Live Entertainment Capital of the World

Nestled in Missouri's beautiful Ozark Mountains lies one of the country's most attractive vacation towns for year-round family entertainment.
Kick off your visit on the 8th (Sat): whizz through the canopy at some of the top local zipline courses and adventure parks, identify plant and animal life at Shepherd of the Hills Fish Hatchery, and then walk around Dogwood Canyon Nature Park. On the 9th (Sun), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: examine the collection at Veterans Memorial Museum, look for gifts at Dick's Oldtime 5 & 10, then identify plant and animal life at National Tiger Sanctuary, and finally see the world from above with a helicopter tour.

To see traveler tips, photos, other places to visit, and tourist information, you can read our Branson route maker site.

Getting from Springfield to Branson by car takes about an hour. Other options: take a bus. Expect a daytime high around 85°F in August, and nighttime lows around 66°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 9th (Sun) so you can travel to Hermann.

Things to do in Branson

Parks · Wildlife · Tours · Shopping

Side Trips

Hermann

— 1 night
Hermann is a city designated in 1842 as the county seat of Gasconade County, Missouri, United States. On the 10th (Mon), sample the fine beverages at Wood Hat Spirits Distillery, get interesting insight from Tours, then learn about winemaking at Stone Hill Winery, and finally do a tasting at Adam Puchta Winery.

To see where to stay, reviews, ratings, and tourist information, read Hermann trip itinerary website.

Traveling by car from Branson to Hermann takes 3.5 hours. August in Hermann sees daily highs of 84°F and lows of 65°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 10th (Mon) so you can travel to Hannibal.

Things to do in Hermann

Wineries · Tours · Outdoors · Adventure

Side Trip

Hannibal

— 1 night
Hannibal is a city in Marion and Ralls counties in the U.S. Kick off your visit on the 11th (Tue): take an in-depth tour of Rockcliffe Mansion, then steep yourself in history at Mark Twain Boyhood Home, and then explore the fascinating underground world of Mark Twain Cave and Cameron Cave.

To see photos and tourist information, refer to the Hannibal travel planning site.

You can drive from Hermann to Hannibal in 2 hours. August in Hannibal sees daily highs of 85°F and lows of 65°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 11th (Tue) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Hannibal

Historic Sites · Nature · Parks · Museums

Missouri travel guide

4.6
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.