8 days in Continental USA Itinerary

8 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States travel planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Sedona
— 1 night
Fly
2
Hot Springs
— 1 night
Fly
3
Pigeon Forge
— 3 nights
Fly
4
Milwaukee
— 1 night
Fly
5
Page
— 1 night
Drive

S M T W T F S
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Sedona

— 1 night

Red Rock Country

Despite its relatively small size, Sedona overflows with tourist appeal.
Kick off your visit on the 11th (Tue): head outdoors with Outdoor Activities.

To see maps, reviews, and more tourist information, read our Sedona sightseeing planning site.

John Day to Sedona is an approximately 16.5-hour car ride. Traveling from John Day to Sedona, you'll lose 1 hour due to the time zone difference. Traveling from John Day in July, expect somewhat warmer with lows of 69°F in Sedona. On the 11th (Tue), wrap the sightseeing up by early afternoon so you can fly to Hot Springs.

Things to do in Sedona

Tours · Outdoors
Highlights from your trip

Hot Springs

— 1 night

Valley of the Vapors

Set deep in the Ouachita Mountains, the city of Hot Springs almost completely surrounds the national park of the same name.
Start off your visit on the 12th (Wed): kick your exploration up a notch at some of the top local zipline courses and adventure parks and then explore the activities along Lake Ouachita.

For more things to do, reviews, photos, and other tourist information, you can read our Hot Springs holiday website.

You can fly from Sedona to Hot Springs in 8 hours. Other options are to drive; or do a combination of bus and taxi. You'll lose 1 hour traveling from Sedona to Hot Springs due to the time zone difference. July in Hot Springs sees daily highs of 92°F and lows of 72°F at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 12th (Wed) to allow time to fly to Pigeon Forge.

Things to do in Hot Springs

Parks · Nature · Tours · Adventure
Highlights from your trip

Pigeon Forge

— 3 nights

Center of Fun in the Smokies

A tiny town with big tourist appeal, Pigeon Forge bills itself as the "Center of Fun in the Smokies." Just a short drive from the national park protecting the diverse plant and animal life of the Great Smoky Mountains, the town features numerous places to visit, such as bars, restaurants, cafes, theaters, and shops.
Bring the kids along to Dollywood and River Rafting & Tubing. Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Pigeon Forge: Zipline (in Hartford) and Foothills Parkway Southwest Parking (in Great Smoky Mountains National Park). There's lots more to do: get up close and personal with brilliant marine life at Ripley's Aquarium of the Smokies, stroll around Chimneys Picnic Area, take in the awesome beauty at Mount LeConte, and see the interesting displays at Hollywood Star Cars Museum.

To see other places to visit, more things to do, and more tourist information, read Pigeon Forge trip itinerary planner.

Traveling by flight from Hot Springs to Pigeon Forge takes 7.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of taxi, bus, subway, and car. The time zone difference when traveling from Hot Springs to Pigeon Forge is 1 hour. Traveling from Hot Springs in July, you will find days in Pigeon Forge are a bit cooler (87°F), and nights are about the same (69°F). Wrap up your sightseeing on the 15th (Sat) to allow time to fly to Milwaukee.

Things to do in Pigeon Forge

Parks · Tours · Outdoors · Adventure

Side Trips

Milwaukee

— 1 night

Brew City

Milwaukee boasts well-preserved historical districts with a rich European past and a strong beer-brewing tradition.
Kick off your visit on the 16th (Sun): get outside with Ray's The Limit Charters and then kick back and relax at Atwater Park & Beach.

To find where to stay, reviews, ratings, and tourist information, refer to the Milwaukee trip planning website.

You can fly from Pigeon Forge to Milwaukee in 6 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of car, bus, subway, and train. The time zone difference when traveling from Pigeon Forge to Milwaukee is minus 1 hour. Traveling from Pigeon Forge in July, expect Milwaukee to be slightly colder, temps between 80°F and 63°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 16th (Sun) so you can fly to Page.

Things to do in Milwaukee

Outdoors · Beaches · Parks

Side Trip

Highlights from your trip

Page

— 1 night

Center of Canyon Country

Originally little more than a simple camp constructed to house workers who built a nearby dam on the Colorado River, Page is now a popular stop for travelers preparing a trip to Arizona's canyon country.
Kick off your visit on the 17th (Mon): contemplate the waterfront views at Lake Powell.

To find photos, more things to do, traveler tips, and more tourist information, refer to the Page attractions planner.

You can fly from Milwaukee to Page in 8 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of train, bus, and shuttle. The time zone difference when traveling from Milwaukee to Page is minus 1 hour. Traveling from Milwaukee in July, expect Page to be a bit warmer, temps between 98°F and 73°F. Wrap up your sightseeing by early afternoon on the 17th (Mon) to allow enough time to travel back home.

Things to do in Page

Parks · Nature
Highlights from your trip

Arizona travel guide

4.3
Canyons · Hiking Trails · Lookouts
The Grand Canyon State
Known as the "Grand Canyon State," Arizona boasts dense forests, deep gorges, sprawling national parks, and modern ski resorts. Native American reservations take up about a quarter of the state, housing several tribes and offering visitors a chance to discover the varied cultures of the country's indigenous population. A patchwork of diverse tourist attractions, Arizona features exclusive golf courses and upscale shops, as well as cactus-covered canyons and stretches of desolate desert straight out of old Westerns, perfect for a vacation far from the city bustle. Though the state still clings to its Old West flavor, its busy college towns packed with young students from around the world exude a cosmopolitan atmosphere.

Arkansas travel guide

4.5
State Parks · Art Museums · Sacred & Religious Sites
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.

Tennessee travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Distilleries · Theme Parks
The Volunteer State
Divided by law, geography, and custom into three major regions, represented by the three stars on state's flag, Tennessee boasts a distinctive musical heritage that includes elements of bluegrass, country-western, and blues. With a countryside as diverse as its people, Tennessee includes landscapes ranging from a mountainous region in the east to the lowlands of the west, with gently rolling hills in the middle. For a well-rounded vacation, you can hike remote mountain trails in the morning and explore the crowded bars of Nashville in the evening. Visit the urban attractions, such as Elvis Presley's former residence in Memphis, but don't miss a chance to spend some time in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, situated in the eastern part of the state.

Wisconsin travel guide

4.2
Specialty Museums · Water Parks · Zoos
The Badger State
Wisconsin is known as "America's Dairyland" because of its status as the nation's most famous producer of milk and cheese. A growing favorite with foreign tourists, the state is a perfect holiday destination for nature lovers, offering year-round outdoor activities like fishing, boating, kayaking, and hiking. Dotted with thousands of inland lakes and waterways alongside apple and cherry orchards, Wisconsin also offers numerous urban tourist attractions, its cities hosting renowned beer and art festivals each year.