8 days in Continental USA Itinerary

8 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States attractions planner

Make it your trip
1
Lexington
— 1 day
Drive
2
Fayetteville
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Asheville
— 2 nights
Drive
4
Cherokee
— 1 night
Drive
5
Chattanooga
— 2 nights
Drive

S M T W T F S
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Lexington

— 1 day

Horse Capital of the World

Known internationally as the "Horse Capital of the World," Lexington boasts a thriving economy resting largely on its thoroughbred racehorse industry.
To find traveler tips, where to stay, more things to do, and other tourist information, refer to the Lexington journey site.

Use the Route module to see travel options from your home to Lexington. In July in Lexington, expect temperatures between 85°F during the day and 67°F at night. You will leave for Fayetteville on the 11th (Sat).

Things to do in Lexington

Nightlife · Parks · Museums · Tours

Fayetteville

— 2 nights
Fayetteville is a town in and the county seat of Fayette County, West Virginia, United States. Start off your visit on the 12th (Sun): whizz through the canopy at some of the top local zipline courses and adventure parks and then take in the views from New River Gorge Bridge. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 13th (Mon): admire the majestic nature at Hawks Nest State Park and then delve into the lush surroundings at Babcock State Park.

For reviews, photos, and other tourist information, read Fayetteville online driving holiday planner.

You can drive from Lexington to Fayetteville in 4 hours. Expect slightly colder temperatures when traveling from Lexington in July; daily highs in Fayetteville reach 80°F and lows reach 62°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 13th (Mon) early enough to travel to Asheville.

Things to do in Fayetteville

Nature · Parks · Adventure · Tours

Side Trips

Asheville

— 2 nights

Land of the Sky

Asheville nestles between two major mountain ranges in the scenic western section of North Carolina.
Kick off your visit on the 14th (Tue): admire the sheer force of Sliding Rock, then take in the dramatic scenery at Looking Glass Falls, then indulge your thirst for a good beer at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Tours & Tastings, and finally get a taste of the local shopping with Lexington Glassworks. On the 15th (Wed), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: stop by Asheville Drum Circle, let the river carry you with a rafting and tubing tour, and then go on a hair-raising tour with a ghost and vampire tour.

To see reviews, maps, traveler tips, and other tourist information, use the Asheville online itinerary builder.

Traveling by car from Fayetteville to Asheville takes 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of car and flight. In July, plan for daily highs up to 84°F, and evening lows to 65°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 15th (Wed) early enough to go by car to Cherokee.

Things to do in Asheville

Tours · Nature · Parks · Adventure

Side Trips

Cherokee

— 1 night

Trails of Legends and Adventures

The center of Cherokee culture in the eastern part of the country, the town named after this Native American tribe serves as a base camp for hiking in the Great Smoky Mountains.
Kick off your visit on the 16th (Thu): take in the dramatic scenery at Mingo Falls, then trot along with a tour on horseback, and then take your sightseeing to a higher altitude at Waterrock Knob.

To see reviews, maps, traveler tips, and more tourist information, read Cherokee trip maker tool.

You can drive from Asheville to Cherokee in 1.5 hours. Expect a daytime high around 83°F in July, and nighttime lows around 62°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 16th (Thu) to allow enough time to drive to Chattanooga.

Things to do in Cherokee

Nature · Parks · Tours · Outdoors

Side Trip

Chattanooga

— 2 nights

Dynamo of Dixie

Once saddled with the reputation of being one of the country's dirtiest cities, Chattanooga now boasts a pedestrian-friendly downtown with a network of leafy waterfront trails and free electric shuttles.
On the 17th (Fri), have fun and explore at Creative Discovery Museum, admire the local landmark of Coolidge Park, then look for gifts at Moon Pie General Store, and finally brush up on your knowledge of spirits at Chattanooga Whiskey Experimental Distillery. Keep things going the next day: explore the engaging exhibits at Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum, hike along Tennessee Riverpark, and then get a new perspective on things with Boat Tours & Water Sports.

For more things to do, photos, other places to visit, and other tourist information, read our Chattanooga trip maker.

Getting from Cherokee to Chattanooga by car takes about 3.5 hours. Other options: do a combination of car, flight, and bus; or do a combination of taxi and bus. Plan for a bit warmer temperatures traveling from Cherokee in July, with highs in Chattanooga at 90°F and lows at 71°F. Cap off your sightseeing on the 18th (Sat) early enough to go by car back home.

Things to do in Chattanooga

Childrens Museums · Museums · Parks · Outdoors

West Virginia travel guide

4.1
Historic Sites · State Parks · Zipline
The Mountain State
Located entirely within the Appalachian Mountain region, the aptly nicknamed "Mountain State" represents the highest state east of the Mississippi River with an average elevation of about 460 m (1,500 ft) above sea level. With an official motto of "Mountaineers are always free," West Virginia is home to a fiercely independent people, proud of their state's rich natural resources, physical beauty, and traditional culture. The state is often overlooked by tourists, and its major attractions retain an off-the-beaten-path character and exemplify a laid-back pace of life. West Virginians like to describe their part of the country as both wild and wonderful, a claim you can easily test on a holiday here by filling your itinerary with exploration of the state's green mountains, white-water rivers, and historical small towns.

North Carolina Mountains travel guide

4.5
Historic Sites · Zipline · River Rafting & Tubing
Called the "Land of the Blue Mist" by the Cherokee Indians, the North Carolina Smoky Mountains are one of the world's most biologically diverse wilderness areas. The vast national park sheltering the native wildlife of these ancient mountains offers a close look at the area's nature and its people. A perfect spot for a tranquil vacation, the blue-misted mountains are one of the country's few World Heritage Sites, protecting the largest old-growth forest east of the Mississippi River. Things to do for adventurous visitors include whitewater rafting and river tubing, while those interested in more urbane entertainment can explore the area's many small towns on the 750 km (470 mi) scenic road meandering over the mountains.