9 days in United States Itinerary

9 days in United States Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States trip planner

Plan created by another user. Make it yours
+2
Bus to Milwaukee, WI - General Mitchell International Airport, Fly to Boston, Bus to Franconia
1
Franconia
— 1 night
Drive
2
Ogunquit
— 1 night
Drive
3
Boston
— 1 night
Drive
4
Newport
— 1 night
Drive
5
Mystic
— 1 night
Drive
6
New York City
— 3 nights
Fly

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1
night
Franconia

Franconia is a town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. Kick off your visit on the 2nd (Sun): immerse yourself in nature at Franconia Notch State Park and then explore the striking landscape at Flume Gorge.

For reviews, where to stay, and tourist information, you can read our Franconia vacation planner.

Madison to Franconia is an approximately 11-hour combination of bus and flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. Due to the time zone difference, you'll lose 1 hour traveling from Madison to Franconia. Traveling from Madison in August, plan for a bit cooler nights in Franconia, with lows around 52°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 2nd (Sun) early enough to drive to Ogunquit.

Things to do in Franconia

Parks · Nature · Historic Sites

1
night
Ogunquit

Ogunquit means "beautiful place by the sea" in the language of the Native Americans who inhabited the region long ago, and this remains an accurate description of this holiday destination today.
Kick off your visit on the 3rd (Mon): appreciate the extensive heritage of Marginal Way Walkway, explore the striking landscape at Perkins Cove, and then visit a coastal fixture at Nubble Lighthouse.

For ratings, more things to do, and tourist information, read our Ogunquit attractions planner.

Traveling by car from Franconia to Ogunquit takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of bus and car; or take a bus. In August in Ogunquit, expect temperatures between 80°F during the day and 54°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 3rd (Mon) so you can drive to Boston.

Things to do in Ogunquit

Historic Sites · Parks · Nature

Side Trip

1
night
Boston

Beantown

Rich in museums, restaurants, shops, and historical sites, Boston attracts over 16 million visitors each year. New England's largest and most influential city, Boston ranks among the world's major centers of education and culture.
Kick off your visit on the 4th (Tue): stroll the grounds of Mount Auburn Cemetery, then explore the world behind art at Museum of Fine Arts, and then wander the streets of North End.

To see traveler tips, reviews, ratings, and tourist information, use the Boston trip maker.

Traveling by car from Ogunquit to Boston takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of taxi and train; or take a bus. Traveling from Ogunquit in August, you can expect nighttime temperatures to be somewhat warmer in Boston, with lows of 65°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 4th (Tue) to allow time to drive to Newport.

Things to do in Boston

Museums · Historic Sites · Neighborhoods

Side Trip

1
night
Newport

City by the Sea

With coastline on the west, south, and east, Newport is a maritime city with a rich history.
Start off your visit on the 5th (Wed): cruise along Ocean Drive Historic District, then examine the collection at The Breakers, then get to know the fascinating history of Cliff Walk, and finally take in the architecture and atmosphere at St. Mary's Catholic Church.

To see traveler tips, maps, other places to visit, and tourist information, use the Newport online trip itinerary planner.

Getting from Boston to Newport by car takes about 2 hours. Other options: take a bus; or do a combination of train and bus. In August, daily temperatures in Newport can reach 79°F, while at night they dip to 63°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 5th (Wed) so you can go by car to Mystic.

Things to do in Newport

Historic Sites · Outdoors · Museums · Scenic Drive

1
night
Mystic

A historical leading seaport, Mystic has maintained a strong respect for the past.
Start off your visit on the 6th (Thu): look and learn at Mystic Seaport Museum, then admire the masterpieces at Florence Griswold Museum, and then immerse yourself in nature at Fort Trumbull State Park.

To find ratings, maps, more things to do, and other tourist information, refer to the Mystic vacation builder website.

You can drive from Newport to Mystic in 1.5 hours. Another option is to do a combination of bus and train. In August in Mystic, expect temperatures between 79°F during the day and 63°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 6th (Thu) so you can drive to New York City.

Things to do in Mystic

Museums · Shopping · Historic Sites · Outdoors

Side Trips

3
nights
New York City

Big Apple

Writer Pearl Buck once called New York City “a place apart,” and this giant urban center remains unlike any other in the world.
Discover out-of-the-way places like St. Patrick's Cathedral and Ellis Island. Popular historic sites such as 9/11 Memorial and World Trade Center Memorial Foundation are in your itinerary. There's still lots to do: admire the masterpieces at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, enjoy breathtaking views from Empire State Building, walk around Central Park, and pause for some photo ops at Statue of Liberty National Monument.

To find other places to visit, maps, traveler tips, and more tourist information, you can read our New York City trip planner.

You can drive from Mystic to New York City in 3 hours. Other options are to take a train; or fly. Traveling from Mystic in August, New York City is somewhat warmer at night with lows of 71°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 9th (Sun) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in New York City

Museums · Parks · Historic Sites · Neighborhoods

United States travel guide

4.5
Specialty Museums · Beaches · Historic Sites
More than the country of car-packed streets seen in TV shows and movies, the United States of America is a complex and diverse home to over 300 million people living in a wide range of landscapes and climates. From its big-city skyscrapers to its sprawling natural parks, the country's ''melting pot'' combines many ethnic groups that share a strong sense of national identity despite their cultural differences. A country of road trips and big blue skies, the United States harbors orderly cities filled with restaurants, parks, museums, and innumerable sightseeing opportunities, as well as pristine natural areas perfect for a holiday in the great outdoors. To see as much as you can of this diverse land quickly, drive over some of the more than 6 million km (4 million mi) of highways leading through deserts, mountain peaks, fertile fields, and giant urban centers.

Maine travel guide

4.5
Beaches · Lighthouses · Mountains
The Pine Tree State
The easternmost state in New England, Maine features an indented coastline and forested interior, carved eons ago by receding glaciers. Maine includes more lighthouses and quaint resort villages than you could ever hope to explore in a single trip, but the state is also one of the country's most sparsely populated, the majority of its land pristine and uninhabited wilderness. The temperate coastal regions, historically supported by fishing and lobstering, contain most of the state's urban centers and are the most popular spots in the state for holidays. The sea is the focus here, so it shouldn't come as a surprise that water plays an important role in the distinct character of the state, shaping its economy, tourism, cuisine, politics, sports, and art.

Massachusetts travel guide

4.3
History Museums · Art Museums · Historic Walking Areas
The Bay State
Known as the "Bay State" because of the three bays dominating its coastline, Massachusetts has played a significant cultural and commercial role through most of the country's history. An increasingly popular vacation destination for foreign travelers, Massachusetts offers numerous places to visit, ranging from historical sites to modern urban centers famous for their culinary, art, and nightlife scenes. With the majority of its population living in and around the city of Boston, in the 20th century Massachusetts went from a state largely dependent on fishing and agriculture to the country's leader in higher education, healthcare, high technology, and financial services. Home to renowned universities and research centers, the state's cities attract a young crowd of students, scientists, artists, and business professionals.

Rhode Island travel guide

4.6
Specialty Museums · Historic Walking Areas · Architectural Buildings
The Ocean State
Despite being the country's smallest state, Rhode Island includes over 640 km (400 mi) of coastline, courtesy of Narragansett Bay and more than 30 islands. Most of the state is part of the U.S. mainland, despite its somewhat misleading name. Though it takes only about 40 minutes to drive across this tiny state, Rhode Island includes more white sandy beaches than most visitors can hope to explore on a single trip. The state's one big city and surrounding small towns brim with places to visit, such as museums, galleries, restaurants, bars, and historical neighborhoods packed with colonial-era buildings. Although the state may seem small, your holiday itinerary is sure to be chock-full.

Connecticut travel guide

4.3
Historic Sites · Aquariums · Theaters
The Constitution State
Perhaps best known for its renowned private and public universities, Connecticut was once home to the country's first law school and still boasts one of the oldest secondary schools in America. More than just a small state packed with students, Connecticut offers visitors a chance to explore some of New England's finest tourist attractions while on vacation, including lighthouses, beaches, theaters, museums, galleries, and restaurants. Despite its small size, the state also boasts two large casino complexes, both located on Native American reservations. Rich in history and natural beauty, Connecticut draws newcomers from around the world, with large Polish, Chinese, and Hispanic communities.

New York State travel guide

4.5
Observation Decks · Scenic Walking Areas · Monuments
The Empire State
Home to the country's most populous city, the state of New York is a major gateway for immigration into the United States, but also one of the nation's prime holiday destinations. Take a trip down the state's numerous wilderness trails and scenic roads to visit quaint small towns, sandy beaches, historical estates, and artist colonies. Though the majority of visitors head for the big-city restaurants, theaters, and museums, you can venture deeper into the rugged and remote mountain areas to discover a world of picturesque forests, rivers, mountains, and lakes. New York also boasts the nation's largest forest preserve, encompassing much of the northeastern lobe of the state.