Knoxville National Cemetery, Knoxville

4.9
#8 of 11 in Historic Sites in Knoxville
Cemetery · Hidden Gem · Tourist Spot
Create an itinerary including Knoxville National Cemetery
Knoxville National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located in the city of Knoxville, Tennessee, United States. Established during the Civil War in 1863, the cemetery currently encompasses 9.8 acres (4.0 ha), and as of the end of 2007, had 9,006 interments. The 60-foot (18 m) Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries.
By using our Knoxville travel itinerary planner, you can arrange your visit to Knoxville National Cemetery and other attractions in Knoxville.
Source
Create a full itinerary - for free!

Knoxville National Cemetery reviews

Rate this attraction
TripAdvisor traveler rating
TripAdvisor traveler rating 5.0
9 reviews
Google
4.8
TripAdvisor
  • Beautiful monument and memorial to al those that lost their lives fighting for this country! Rest in Peace 
    Beautiful monument and memorial to al those that lost their lives fighting for this country! Rest in Peace  more »
  • This was a solemn little cemetery. It had a few signs talking about the reason for the cemetery, the National Cemetery system, and the Gettysburg Address (which applies for all of the nation's... 
    This was a solemn little cemetery. It had a few signs talking about the reason for the cemetery, the National Cemetery system, and the Gettysburg Address (which applies for all of the nation's...  more »
Google
  • One of the best small national cemeteries developed during the Civil War era, in my humble opinion, and I've seen many. My son and I found it taking a wrong turn while wife and daughter were attending University of Tennessee (Go Vols! LOL) orientation. I did not know that East Tennessee refused to join the CSA during the Civil War and fought for the GAR, as explained in the interpretive plaques. The final resting place of two CMOH recipients, Timothy Spillane (Civil War - died 1901) and Troy A. McGill (WWII - KIA 1944). For tree lovers, it contains one of the largest black maples (Acer nigrum) I have ever seen and it is in good condition!
  • We stumbled upon this while visiting Knoxville, stopped and drove around. It’s well taken care of.

Plan your trip to Knoxville

  • Get a personalized trip
    A full day by day itinerary based on your preferences
  • Customize it
    Refine your trip. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Manage it
    Everything in one place. Everyone on the same page.