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Liberty Bell Center, Philadelphia

4.3
#2 of 63 in Historic Sites in Philadelphia
Must see · Monument · Landmark
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The former site of Washington's slave quarters sits near the entrance of Liberty Bell Center. Upon entering the center, you'll find a series of exhibits before reaching the Liberty Bell. The bell is displayed out of reach (but in plain sight) and still hangs on what is thought to be the original yolk made of American elm. The bell's recognizable crack is clearly visible--observers have referred to it as a metaphor for the fragility of democracy. Be aware that all visitors are required to go through a security screening at the entrance. For Liberty Bell Center and beyond, use our Philadelphia trip itinerary planning website to get the most from your Philadelphia vacation.
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Liberty Bell Center reviews

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  • There was short queue to get into the centre and the museum was very well laid out and informative. It was wonderful to see the Bell having learned it's history on the way through. A must do when... 
    There was short queue to get into the centre and the museum was very well laid out and informative. It was wonderful to see the Bell having learned it's history on the way through. A must do when...  more »
  • We were lucky that we got there without a crowd. The museum before the bell is well worth visiting. In fact it was probably as important as seeing the actual bell. 
    We were lucky that we got there without a crowd. The museum before the bell is well worth visiting. In fact it was probably as important as seeing the actual bell.  more »
Google
  • It feels surprisingly comforting to be enveloped by America's birthplace. The place where forty-eight colonist and eight citizens of the British Isles, gave birth to the American dream. Her clapper struck to announce the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. She is inscribed, "Proclaim liberty¬†throughout all the land unto all inhabitants thereof." ¬†The beloved bell was hidden during the Revolutionary War. After Independence, her E-flat ring sounded loud and clear, until 1824, when the tension within her metal gave way. She cracked. Standing before her, in silence, she still rings of hope. So close you could almost touch the past. Yet, separated to prevent our fingers from doing further damage to the future. Funny, how a cracked piece of metal can remind us of what so many did to build our nation. Good or bad it all started here. The building, protecting the cherished symbol, contains the history of the Bell with pictures and stories. After passing through security, you can take your time wondering through its serpentine displays. There are stories about the casting of the Bell, from the moment of its creation to the painful moment when the ring became impossible. (History tells us that the Bell cracked, was melted and recast at least four times before July, 1776.) Everything is wheelchair accessible in the Liberty Bell Center at Independence National Historic Park. Admission is free, although the lines may be long. There are no bathrooms. However, facilities are available in the Visitors Center across the street. The Visitor Center covers much of early American history. There is a cell phone charging station and a small dining area. The gift shop specializes in Ben Franklin memorabilia. Parking is available under the Visitors Center. Philadelphia Hall, across the park, is where the Declaration of Independence was signed. In my imagination, I still hear the crystal clear sound of the Liberty Bell. May it ring forever.
  • We always love national parks and visiting the Liberty Bell is no exception. The visitor center is great, well built and maintained, and the only restroom in the vicinity of the Liberty bell. The museum is airy and well lit. There are great interpretive signs all over the museum. The collection is great and covers a lot of the revolutionary period focusing on the lives of the founding fathers. There is a sub exhibit for the history of women's rights that is worth some time. There is another one for the history of civil rights and the life of slaves and freed men and women in the colonial era. The Park Service is doing a great job spacing out the visitors to keep the indoor crowds small. It is heartening to know that they care enough to keep us all safe and to take reasonable precautions. We always love visiting this museum. It is worth your time.

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