Florida Holocaust Museum, St. Petersburg

4.6
#5 of 21 in Museums in St. Petersburg
History Museum · Hidden Gem · Museum
Create an itinerary including Florida Holocaust Museum
The Florida Holocaust Museum is a Holocaust museum located at 55 Fifth Street South in St. Petersburg, Florida. Founded in 1992, it moved to its current location in 1998. Formerly known as the Holocaust Center, the museum officially changed to its current name in 1999. It is one of the largest Holocaust museums in the United States. It was founded by Walter and Edith Lobenberg both of whom were German Jews who escaped persecution in Nazi Germany by immigrating to the United States. Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel served as Honorary Chairman and cut the ribbon at the 1998 opening ceremony. The Florida Holocaust Museum is one of three Holocaust Museums that are accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. The museum works with the local community and survivors of the Holocaust to spread awareness and to educate the public on the history of the Holocaust.
Make Florida Holocaust Museum a part of your St. Petersburg vacation plans using our St. Petersburg trip itinerary site.
Source
Create a full itinerary - for free!

Florida Holocaust Museum reviews

Rate this attraction
TripAdvisor traveler rating
TripAdvisor traveler rating 4.5
595 reviews
Google
4.7
TripAdvisor
  • The museum did a good job providing background information of a horrible historical time. We spent one hour and fifteen minutes at the museum. They had one of boxcars used in Germany - which I had... 
    The museum did a good job providing background information of a horrible historical time. We spent one hour and fifteen minutes at the museum. They had one of boxcars used in Germany - which I had...  more »
  • exciting city, nice to be in a woke environment, difficult to find in Florida. I love the haters too, 
    exciting city, nice to be in a woke environment, difficult to find in Florida. I love the haters too,  more »
Google
  • This museum is very nice and well done. The majority of what you are going to see is on the first floor. It has many exhibits and a train that was used in the transportation of Jews to the concentration camp. There are many displays that give you the history of the Jews and ultimately the racism they encountered through the years. It also gives you a good perspective of the concentration camps. I have just returned from Auschwitz last month and there were many things that this Museum also shows. One thing I would recommend is to sit by the train there is a Heroes gallery that Scrolls through the stories of different Heroes who helped Jews during World War II and saved many lives . The second floor has an art display but more importantly in the corner is a room that houses a dimensions in testimony exhibit. This I think is one of the best parts of this whole museum. You click a mouse and ask a question and through artificial intelligence the person responds back to your question in video. The person I was interacting with was Mary and I even asked her to say a few words in Polish and she did I was thoroughly amazed. You can ask her questions such as what is her Legacy or how did she survive or how was the ghetto that she lived in and she answers the questions and it's really quite amazing. The third floor has more exhibits that are more art. There are several displays and a almost like classroom area.
  • I cannot properly put into words how incredible my experience was here. I was greeted by Ms. Kay-Lynne Taylor, who was so kind, helpful, and provided me with a wealth of information. During our conversation, I let her know I decided to become a member and that I am a teacher. She then provided me with brochures and cards and talked about next steps for field trips and who to talk to for resources for my students. Additionally, I brought my 2-year old daughter, which I was hesitant to do, for obvious reasons. This museum deserves reverence and somberness. However, Ms. Taylor did not show any kind of negativity towards a toddler being in the museum. It was the total opposite. She was so sweet to her, and when we parted ways and started to go into the museum, my daughter gave her a hug, which is something she doesn't usually do to people she doesn't know. It made me want to cry (in a good way). The museum itself has an outstanding collection, and it is put together so well. There are photos, documents, bricks from Auschwitz, prisoner clothing, the boxcar, the room with a boxcar, the story behind the boxcar, artwork, shoes, a letter from Einstein...like I said, an outstanding collection. I could spend hours in there and will be going back as soon as I can. The staff do a phenomenal job of maintaining the memories to make sure this generation and future generations never forget the atrocities that occurred during the Holocaust. The Florida Holocaust Museum is worth the trip, time, and any kind of financial donation you can give. You will be met with some of the most brilliant staff who care about you and your experience. My only recommendation...expand the gift shop so museum patrons can purchase and support in more ways!

Plan your trip to St. Petersburg

  • Get a personalized trip
    A full day by day itinerary based on your preferences
  • Customize it
    Refine your trip. We'll find the
    best routes and schedules
  • Manage it
    Everything in one place. Everyone on the same page.